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Ten Days 

At Monte Carlo 



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Ten Days 
At Monte Carlo 

At the Bank's Expense 

Containing 

Hints to Visitors 

and 
A General Guide to the Neighbourhood 

By V. B. 



With a Map 



i 

L London 

! William Heinemann 

1898 



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In compliance with current 
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of Minnesota Bindery 
produced this facsimile on 
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replace the irreparably 
deteriorated original volume 
owned by the University of 
Minnesota Library. 1995 



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TO MY FRIEND 

SB. $. 

I DKDICATZ THIS! FAGSS 

IN GRATEFUL REMEMBRANCE OF MUCH KINDNESS AND 

HOSPITALITY RECEIVED AT HIS HANDS. 

V. B. 






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INTRODUCTION 

Ask any one who has visited Monte Carlo 
how they like the place, the majority will say : 
"Oh, it's all very well for a day or two, but 
there's nothing on earth to be done there, 
except the gambling, and as nobody ever 
wins, it becomes very expensive after a time ! " 

I once knew a honeymoon couple, who spent 
a month there. I dined with them the night 
before they left, and found they were utterly 
sick of it, and vowed they would never come 
again ; and when I learnt how they had spent 
their time, I was not surprised. 

Their programme was as follows : — they got 
up late, took a stroll for about half-an-hour on 
the Terrace, and then went and lunched heavily 
at Ciro's. This took from twelve till two, after 
which they went straight over to the gambling- 
rooms, and played steadily till 6.30. They then 
went home and dressed, and had a long and 
rich dinner either at the Paris or the Grand, 



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Introduction 



after which they again repaired to the Rooms 
and gambled until closing-time. At the end of 
a month, I found they had never taken a walk 
or even a drive ; they had never been to Cap 
Martin or La Turbie, and did not even know 
that one of the loveliest orchestras in Europe 
could be heard almost every day free of charge. 
Eating, drinking, and gambling had been their 
daily programme, and of course they departed 
feeling very ill, and much annoyed with them- 
selves for having lost a considerable sum of 
money. 

This was an exaggerated case, no doubt, but 
I have met hundreds nearly as bad, and it is for 
the enlightenment of such as these that I take 
up my feeble pen. We are not all ardent cyclists, 
I am aware, although it is daily becoming more 
rare to mid any .one under fifty who does not 
'bike': still, as a general rule, wherever a 
bicycle can go a carriage can follow, and if I 
succeed in persuading only a few to leave the 
unhealthy atmosphere of the Casino on a fine 
day and explore the beauties of this lovely 
country — whether it be on a ' bike,' in a car- 
riage, or, on foot — I shall consider that my 
labours have -not been in vain.. It may be as 
well' to mention that none of the rides, herein 
described, are beyond the powers of even the 
average lady cyclist. 



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Introduction 



As regards the Roulette, please let it be under- 
stood that I do not for a moment profess to 
have discovered an infallible system. It has 
been my principal study to discover why most 
people lose, and having more or less arrived at 
that, I have endeavoured to frame a system on 
entirely opposite lines. Personally, I never could 
see the fun of losing money at the tables. You 
see some people going in day after day, never 
coming out with a fifty-centime piece, and yet 
thoroughly enjoying themselves. To my mind 
this is incomprehensible. It is not so much .the 
loss of the money, as the sense of defeat, which 
annoys me, and if the Bank worsted me two days 
in succession, I should probably relinquish the 
struggle. I would rather sit for hours to win a 
five-franc piece than come out a loser. 

I quite recognize the fact that my system is of 
no use to gamblers ; they would rather lose their 
money than attempt to play it ; but should there 
be a few people, who are obliged to remain at 
Monte Carlo for several months, and whom it 

) might amuse to win a louis or two; a day, I 

I recommend them to try it. 

The numbers given herein, actually did turn 

f- up at the table mentioned, on ten consecutive 

days. There can be no fairer test for any system, 
and I honestly believe, that if a thousand people 
were to come down, armed with sufficient capital, 



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Introduction 



and were to play the system to win ^50 a 
day each, the Administration of the Casino 
would very soon be compelled to close their 
doors. 

The Author. 

Monte Carlo, 

May 15, 1898. 



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CONTENTS 



CHAPTER I PAGE 

Frank Curzon talks of Monte Carlo, and Wilfrid 
Blundell— The Game of Roulette— Percentages in 
favour of the Bank— Why most people lose— The 
American System-Players and their System i 

CHAPTER II 
Blundcll and his System— Frank Curzon and I 
decide to give it a trial 12 

CHAPTER III 
Preparations for Monte Carlo — Bicycles on the 
Riviera— The Touring Club de France— Smith's 
Bank— Casino Customs— 'The Viatique *— Press 
Subsidies — Blackmailers defeated . .26 

CHAPTER IV 
Hints for the Journey— The Train de Luxe— 
The Yankee and his distinguished Card-sharper 
— Climate of Monte Carlo— Ciro and Ciro's 
Restaurant— Lunch at Ciro's— First Day's Play . 37 

CHAPTER V 
First Bicycle Ride— La Cremaillere— La Turbie— 
Corniche Road— Valley of the Paillon— Eze— 
Cap Martin — Lunch at Cap Martin Hotel- 
Second Day's Play . . . . .53 

CHAPTER VI 
Second Bicycle Ride— Monte Carlo to Nice— The 
Legend of Saint Devote— Beaulieu— Villefranche 
—The ' London House '—Third Day's Play- 
Concert at the Casino— The Monte Carlo Orchestra 65 



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Contents 

CHAPTER VII PACB 

Third Ride— La Turbie— The Monastery of Laghet 
— ' Ex Votos '—The Gold-embroidered Slippers 
of the Comtesse de B— — . — Laghet to Nice— St. 
Jean— Cap St Hospice — Fourth Day's Play— A 
Triumph for the System ... . .78 

CHAPTER VIII 
Fourth Ride — Railway of the Sud de la France — 
Nice — Colomars — Tourettes — Vence — Cagnes — 
Fifth Day's Play — French 'as she is spoke' at 
the Tables— Restaurant of the Hdtel de Paris- 
Monsieur Fleury 93 

CHAPTER IX 
Fifth Ride — Grassse — Fragonard and his famous 
Panels — Magagnosc — Villeneuve-Loubet — Sixth 
Day's Play 105 

CHAPTER X 
Sixth Ride — Peillon — PeiUe — Pic de Baudon— 
Seventh Day's Play— Restaurant of the Grand 
Hotel — Francois no, 

CHAPTER XI 
Seventh Ride — The Man who played successfully for 
Ten Years — Cagnes — Biot— Antibes— Juan-les- 
Pins— Cap d' Antibes— Eighth Day's Plav— Hdtcl 
* Terminus at Nice . . . . 134 

CHAPTER XII 
Eighth Ride— Paget- Theniers— Entrevaux— Touet 
de Beuil— La Mescla— St. Martin du Var— 
Ninth Day's Play 144 

CHAPTER XIII 
Ninth Ride— Laghet— Contes— Nice-Riquier— 
Tenth Day's Play — Summary of Ten Days' 
Results— Total Expenses and Net Profit . .154 

CHAPTER XIV 
The Hotels and Restaurants of Monte Carlo— Monte 

Carlo Sharps and Swindlers— Hints to Visitors . 162 
Addenda . • jyg 



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: 



THE RESTAURANT AND HOTEL 
L'HERMITAGE 

MONTE CARLO. 



AFFILIATED WITH THE PRINCES' BESTIUMHT, LOHDON. 



The most luxurious and best appointed Establishment 
in Monte Carlo, with full South View of the Mediterranean. 

A special advantage to Visitors is afforded by the Spacious 
Gardens attached to the Premises, and its close proximity to 
the Casino. 

Acting Directors: 
V. BENOIST and G. FOURAULT. 



The Princes' Restaurant 

PICCADILLY, LONDON, W. 

Universally admitted to be the most fashion' 
able Rendezvous in London 

FOR 

LUNCHE0N5, DINNERS 
AND 5UPPERS. 



BOCCHPS ORCHESTRA. 



Managing Director: GUSTAVE FOURAULT. 

W 



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A HIGH-CLASS WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 

PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY 

PRICE TWOPENCE 



THE MAN OF THE WORLD GOES 
ALL OVER THE WORLD 



OFFICES - 
52 Fleet Street, LONDON, E.G. 



READ 

11 



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The Best City Weekly 



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jfr TEN DAYS 

AT MONTE CARLO 



CHAPTER I 

Frank Canon talks of Monte Carlo, and Wilfrid Blundell 
—The Game of Roulette — Percentages in favour of the 
Bank — Why most people lose — The American System- 
Players and their System. 

Frank Curzon and I had always been chums. 
We had been at the same house at Eton to- 
gether, and had gone up to New College, Oxford, 
at about the same time. After that he went 
to the Bar, and I went into the City, so we rather 
lost sight of one another, except for casual 
meetings at the Club. 

One evening last November I found him 
dining alone at the Club, so went and sat at the 
same table. We began with the usual abuse of 
the weather, which had been rather excelling 
itself, even for November in London. Morning 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

after morning we had awoke, with a sort of 
choking sensation in our throats, and had sat 
down to breakfast by lamp-light: this sort of 
thing was usually accompanied by a raw easterly 
wind, which if it did succeed in somewhat dis- 
pelling the fog, generally brought rain in the 
course of the day. London was certainly most 
gloomy and depressing. 

"Thank goodness," said Frank, "I shall 
hope to see the sun again in about a fortnight's 
time ; I am off for my annual trip to Monte 
Carlo." 

"The Bar must be looking up, old chap," 
said I, " if it will run to annual trips to Monte 
Carlo; I suppose it will cost you a couple of 
hundred at least, and the City won't stand that, 
with business as it is at present" 

" I've no doubt," he replied, " that it costs 
most people all that, and some people a great 
deal more, but I shall be very much surprised 
if it costs me anything at all ; at any rate it 
hasn't done so for the last five years." 

" What is the secret ? " I inquired. 

" Simply this," he said ; " you have no doubt 
heard the old story that ' Rouge perd, et noir 
perd, mais c'est toujours Blanc, qui gagne ' ; in 
my case I can only say that ' Rouge perd quel- 
quefois, et noir perd quelquefois, mais Blanc 
perd toujours,' and as long as Monsieur Blanc, 



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! 



| Wilfrid Blundell 

or rather the long-suffering shareholders of the 
Monte Carlo Casino, continue to pay my ex- 
penses, as they have always done up to the 
present, so long shall I continue to spend my 
Christmas amongst them." 

"Do you mean to. tell me, then, that you 
have discovered an infallible system ? " 

" No," said Frank, " I won't go quite so far 
as to say that, because, with all due respect to 
the Vatican, I don't believe that anything in 
this world is infallible ; but what I do believe 
is, that as long as I continue to play on the 
same system, as I have done for the last five 
years, it is good to bet odds on my defeating 
the Bank ; and as I hold an unbeaten certificate 
up to the present, it is difficult to say what 
those odds really are." 

"Is the system your own invention," I in- 
quired, " or were you shown it by some one ? " 

"I got the idea," he said, "from a very 
( shrewd person whom I came across during my 

} first visit to the place. I was given a letter of 

introduction to a man called Wilfred Blundell. 
He has lived at Monte Carlo for a good 
number of years, but is not allowed to gamble, 
as he holds an official position there ; he may 
consequently be regarded as the looker-on who 
sees most of the game. 

" I had several long talks with Blundell, and 
3 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

found that he had many interesting theories 
regarding gamblers, and the Bank. 

"He was rather a reticent person, but if 
you got him all to yourself, especially after 
dinner, and started him on his favourite topic, 
you could learn a lot from him. 

" Well, one evening, after an excellent dinner 
that I had given him at Ciro's, he asked me to 
come round to his rooms, and sample his cigars 
and old whisky. 

"As soon as we were comfortably settled before 
a good fire, and had got our cigars and drinks 
well under way, I turned the conversation on 
to the subject of gambling, and found my host 
in an unusually communicative frame of mind. 

" ' You have no doubt often heard,' he said, 
'and doubtless believe, that the Bank wins 
owing to the advantage which it has over the 
players. It is the popular belief that no system 
can succeed whilst the Bank possesses this 
advantage. 

" ' Now, in my opinion, the percentage in favour 
of the Bank is so small, that the serious system 
player need not even take it Into consideration 
at all. It only affects people who play recklessly 
on numbers without realizing the folly pf their 
game ; but there are so many fools in the world, 
that in this respect the Bank does reap a very 
material benefit 

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Ignorance of Players 



" * It was only the other evening that I almost 
quarrelled with one of my oldest friends, through 
trying to convince her of this fact. Mrs. Henry 
Walsh has, to my certain knowledge, lost about 
^£500 a year at Monte Carlo, regularly for the 
last twenty years, simply through playing reck- 
lessly on the numbers, and transversals, with- 
out any system at all. Although she is in other 
respects an intelligent and highly cultivated old 
lady, it is quite impossible to convince her of 
the folly of her ways, for she firmly believes that 
her losses are entirely due to her bad luck, and 
nothing else. She got quite angry when I told 
her that people who were content to play on 
even chances were just twice as likely to win, in 
the long run, as people who played on numbers ; 
and when I told her that the more numbers you 
covered, the less likely you were to win, on a 
serifes of "coups," she told me "I was talking 
utter nonsense, and that, as she had played the 
game for twenty years, and / had never played 
at all, she must know more about it than I did ! " . 
So I have given her up as hopeless, and as long 
as she is well enough to come to Monte Carlo 
and gamble, so long can the shareholders of the 
Casiriof count upon a certain ^500 a year. 

'"Possibly you yourself have never realized 
the true percentage of advantage that the Bank 
has over the player. Most people will tell you 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

that the Bank has one chance better than you 
in every thirty-seven spins. This is quite correct 
if you only play on one number " en plein," but 
if you play on an even chance the Bank has 
only half this advantage over you, or one chance 
better than you in every seventy-four spins, the 
reason being that when your stake is on an 
even chance, and zero appears, you do not lose 
your whole stake, but only half of it : the player 
always having the right to take off half his stake. 

"'You would think, then, that it would be 
fairly obvious to most people, that if you put a 
louis on the first eighteen numbers " en plein," 
instead of putting eighteen louis on " manque," 
you are doing a very foolish thing; for 
when zero comes out, as it should do once in 
every thirty-seven spins, you would lose the 
whole of your eighteen louis, whereas if you had 
put them on to "manque," you only lose nine of 
them; in other words, the man who plays on 
the numbers is quite sure to lose, on the average, 
nine louis an hour more than the man who 
plays on "manque." 

" ' Yet you would be surprised to find how 
few of the people who come and play in these 
Rooms have grasped even this elementary fact. 
Much less have they grasped the fact, that the 
more numbers they cover, the less chance they 
have of winning. 

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The Bank's Percentage 

" ' It was only the other day that I was enunci- 
ating this theory to a man, who had been here 
very often, and won and lost thousands of 
pounds. He could not see it, so I said, "Not 
only is what I say a positive fact, but I can 
prove to you that if you cover sufficient numbers, 
the Bank has a ioo per cent, advantage over 
you ! " 

" ' He said the idea of such a thing was quite 
absurd, and offered to bet me ^10 that I was 
wrong. I took the bet, and proceeded to ex- 
plain to him that if he staked one piece "en 
plein" on thirty-five numbers, he could lose 
thirty-five pieces if one or two numbers came 
out, and the most he could possibly win per 
" coup " was one piece : he was, therefore, laying 
35 to i, when the real odds were 35 to 2, or 
1 '7 J to 1 : he was, therefore, laying double the 
proper odds, or in other words, giving the Bank 
an advantage of 100 per cent. He was bound 
to admit that my demonstration was sound, and 
paid up the j£io on the spot. 

"'Perhaps you are not aware, that if you 
back any given dozen, the Bank has a four per 
cent advantage over you, and if you are foolish 
enough to back two dozens for the same spin, 
the Bank has an eight'per cent, advantage over 
you. For if you back one dozen the Bank only- 
bets you two to one that twenty-five numbers 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

will beat twelve, whereas the proper odds are 
2 # o8 to one. And, in the same way, if you 
back two dozens, the Bank makes you lay two 
to one that twenty-four numbers will beat 
thirteen, whereas the proper odds are only 1*84 
to one, and you consequently have a disadvantage 
of eight per cent in the odds.' 

" I had now got Blundell fairly started on his 
favourite topic, and had only got to put in 
a question or two occasionally to keep him 
talking. 

"'Then,' I said, 'your theory is that most 
gamblers are fools, and do not take the trouble 
to -work out the different chances of the 
table?' 

".'Yes/ said Blundell, 'I am sure that not 
One per cent, of the people playing in those 
Rooms at the present moment realize the facts 
that I have just explained to you, and you could 
probably win a bet of ^10, in the same way 
that I did, every other day. 

" ' I can give you a very striking example of 
this,' he continued. 'About two years ago, 
the gambling establishments in New York were 
closed up by the police, and the men who kept 
the tables, and their croupiers, were consequently 
turned loose on society, without an occupation. 
Having nothing better to do, as long as New 
York continued in a moral frame of mind, a 
8 



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The American System-Players 

number of these men formed a syndicate, 
and came over to play at Monte Carlo, on a 
system. 

" 'They had a large capital at their back, and 
were content with small gains, and the result 
was that after a campaign of some four months, 
they went away small winners. 

" ' Knowing that they were professional gam- 
blers, who were playing on a system to make 
money, and not merely as an amusement, I 
thought it would be interesting to find out what 
the system consisted in, and so made friends 
with one of them. He made a tremendous 
secret of the so-called system, and told me that 
the man who invented it had spent years and 
years in working it out, and that it was based 
on the study of some hundreds of thousands of 
spins of the Roulette. At last I got him to 
show it to me. It was most disappointing, very 
complicated, and based on a fallacy. Some 
cranky individual, who had been spinning a 
Roulette Wheel for years, thought he had dis- 
covered, that after a given number had appeare4 
certain numbers were more likely to come out 
than others. He had drawn up the most 
elaborate and complicated tables, giving the 
numbers to be staked on, after any given 
number had come out. They played on about 
eight numbers every spin of the wheel, and if 
9 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

luck went against them gradually increased their 
stakes. 

" 'The man appeared surprised when I pointed 
out to him that by playing on eight numbers 
every " coup," they gave the Bank an advantage 
of three per cent., whereas if they played on 
even chances, that advantage would only be 
i *35 per cent. He said that their discovery was 
worth more than 1*65 per cent., and that the 
proof of this was that they were winning every 
day. I thought it was no good arguing the 
point, but I felt quite sure, in my own mind, 
that their so-called "discovery" amounted to 
nothing at all, and that they won simply because 
they were content to play systematically, to win 
very small stakes, with a large capital behind 
them.' 

"'Then,' I observed, 'you think that you 
know of a system by which it is possible to do 
this with comparatively little risk ? ' 

"'Yes/ he replied; 'I could have shown 
those professionals a system on even chances, 
by which they would have won from eighty to a 
hundred louis a day, with the same capital they 
possessed, and with far less risk than they were 
taking by playing on the numbers. ' 

" ' Did you show it to them ? ' I asked. 

" ' No/ he answered, ' I never show it to any 
but intimate friends, and I should never advise 
10 



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Blundell's System 



any one to try it unless I knew that he possessed 
the necessary capita).' 

" ' How much capital is required ? ' I asked. 

" * At least two hundred pounds to play it in 
louis,' said Blundell. 

" ' I have got more than that with me at 
present,' I said; 'do you mind showing it to 
me t and I will give it a trial.' 

"'Certainly,' he replied, 'if you will come 
and lunch with me to-morrow, I will show it to 
you after lunch, and you can put it to the test.' 

" ' Very many thanks,' said I. ' Good-night ! .' " 



/ 
t 

f 

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CHAPTER II 

BlundeU and his System — Frank Curzon and I decide to 
give it a trial. 

By this time Frank Curzon and I had finished 
dinner, and he proposed that if I was interested, 
and cared to hear all about Blundell and his 
system, we had better adjourn to his rooms, 
where he had all the figures of his play for the 
last five years, exactly as he had worked them at 
the tables. 

We accordingly went round, and Frank pro- 
ceeded to explain to me the system, as shown 
him by Blundell. 

It appears that after many years of careful 
observation, Blundell had arrived at the follow- 
ing conclusions. 

The reason why the Bank wins with such 
regularity, is not because it has a great advan- 
tage over the players in the percentage, but be- 
cause it is a machine, with a practically un- 
limited capital, playing mechanically against a 
12 



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Why the Bank Wins 



host of players, most of whom possess no capital 
at all, and all of whom, at a critic al m oment are 
liable to lose their tempers .and their nerve. 

The punter is also habitually greedy. What 
player do you know who is content to go into 
the Casino, and make even ten per cent, a day 
net profit on his capital ? 

Most of your gambling friends would laugh 
at the idea ! They all expect to double their 
capita], and most of them hope to make four or 
five hundred per cent. And yet the Bank in a 
good year only makes about one'per cent, a week, 
or fifty per cent, per annum ! If the Bank 
expected to win in the same proportion as most 
of the players, its expectations would amount to 
the modest little sum of about four hundred 
millions sterling per annum ! 

The Bank certainly has a great advantage in 
the point of capital, it has the advantage of 
being a machine, and it also possesses the 
advantage of the limit, but against all this you 
must remember that the punter -has also two 
great pulls in his favour. He can continue play- 
ing as long as he is a loser, and can run away 
the moment he is a winner ; and he can vary his 
stake according to whether his luck is good or 
bad. To put It in, vulgar parlance, "the Bank 
has to stand up to be shot at." 

Thjs being so, we must make as much use as 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

possible of our advantages, and endeavour to 
reduce those of the Bank to a minimum. In 
order to do this, we must fight them with their 
own weapons, so to speak, and attacking them 
with a large capital, be content to make a small 
percentage on our money. 

We must play cautiously, and i go very slow/ 
when luck is against us, and the moment the 
luck turns sufficiently to give us a small profit 
on the day, we must leave off at once and give 
the game a rest till the next day. 

Ninety-nine per cent, of all the systems ever 
invented fail for want of sufficient capital ; the 
remaining one per cent, are defeated by the 
maximum. 

Therefore, the only way to hope for success, 
is to attack the Bank with a large capital, in 
such a way that the maximum will probably never 
be reached. 

A very essential point about a good system is 
simplicity. The more elaborate and compli- 
cated your system may be, the more certain it is 
to fail. There is no doubt that the croupiers 
will be on the look-out for the moment when 
you begin to get into deep water, and then, by 
spinning quicker than usual, they will prevent 
your working out any elaborate calculation, to 
arrive at the amount to be staked. They will 
flurry and bustle you, and endeavour to make 
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How to play a System 



you lose your head and your temper, at the 
critical moment, and from what I have seen 
myself and from what players themselves have 
told me, it is very certain that they often 
succeed. 

It is no use people attempting to play a sys- 
tem at Monte Carlo unless they are specially 
qualified to undertake it. A few of the indis- 
pensable qualities are, a clear head, unlimited 
faith in the system, dogged perseverance, the 
best of good tempers, .and plenty of pluck. 
Any one who does not possess all of the above 
| qualifications, in addition to a few others, had 

[ better leave systems alone ; for to play a system 

j impatiently, timidly, or with insufficient capital 

> is quite the surest way to Jose. 

{ Another very important point in playing a 

system, is to give the Bank as little advantage 
I over you as possible ; it ' goes without saying,' 

/ therefore, that all serious systems should always 

be played on the even chances. 
| If your system possesses staying power and is 

backed up by the necessary capital, the best 
thing to do when c zero ' or the ' refait ' occurs, 
f is to take off half your stake and regard the 

[ 'coup' as a loss. The amounts taken off the 

{ table in this way, would be placed aside and 

\ added to your net profits at the end of the day. 

; It will be shown, in due course, that this ' Zero 

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Ten Pays at Monte Carlo 

Sinking Fund ' forms a nice little addition to 
the player's profits, and instead of ' zero ' prov- 
ing a thorn in your side, it will be seen that the 
oftener ' zero ' appears during the play, the 
greater your net gains will be, provided you are 
able to bring the score level before leaving off. 

This method of dealing with • zero ' is adopted 
by hardly any players, as far as I know, but 
. seems to me by far the most sensible, and cer- 
tainly the simplest plan, always provided that 
your system is strong enough to stand it. 

Most systems fail because the stakes are in- 
creased too quickly: the player gets into big 
figures, strikes a run against himself, and is 
either defeated by the maximum, or from want 
of capital. 

The fact of the matter is that he is too greedy, 
and has not sufficient patience. If he com- 
mences by losing, he is in too much of a hurry 
to get his money back. If he wins, at first, he 
stays on at the tables too long and exhausts his 
good luck, winning small sums, and when the 
bad luck sets in, he begins playing high stakes 
and losing. 

Almost all systems are played with a progres- 
sion, that is to say, increasing the stakes every 
• coup ' as long as you are a loser, and continu- 
ing to do so until losses are wiped out, and a 
profit appears. 

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Different Systems 



Some people double their stakes after every 

losing 'coup,' playing i, 2, 4, 8, 16, and so on, 

until they win a ' coup,' when they become the 

„ winner of one unit, whatever the unit in their 

game may be. 

Others play 1, 3, 7, 15, etc., which means that 
they try to win a unit for every l coup ' played. 

Needless to remark that both these systems 
are quite useless, for the moment the player 
strikes an adverse run of 11, he is defeated by 
the maximum, supposing him to have com- 
menced with a stake of one louis, and such a run 
as this might be encountered almost every day. 

A much better system is to play 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 
etc In other words, add one to your stake 
each time whether you lose or whether you win, 
and continue to do so until you have won at 
least one unit. This you count as one point 
gained, and start afresh to win another. 

This is not at all a bad system, but cannot be 
played with safety with a unit of more than one 
louis, and even then requires a very large capital 
behind it. 

The chief advantage in' it is, that the player 
may win far less ( coups' than the Bank on the 
day, and yet come out a good winner at the finish. 

The chief objection to it is, that in the event 
of continued bad luck, the stakes mount up too 
quickly ; and I have seen ' tableaux ' where the 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

player would have been over two thousand louis 
out of pocket, and would have had to play one 
hundred and forty to one hundred and fifty 
louis at a stake in order to get back previous 
losses. The unit is also of necessity too small, 
and the player, consequently, has to remain too 
long at the tables in order to win anything 
appreciable. 

My system is an improved edition of the 
above, and say we are provided with a capital of 
^600, can be played with a unit of five louis. 

The amount we can win depends upon the 
number of hours we are prepared to remain at 
the tables, but for several reasons I don't think 
it would be wise to endeavour to win more than 
four units per day, or ;£i6. Sometimes this 
can be done in five minutes, and sometimes it 
may take three hours, but on the average it 
should not take more than two hours per day. 

Our unit of five louis will be found a very 
convenient one, because the Bank provides gold 
five-louis pieces, commonly known as • plaques,' 
and this will make our calculations and stakes 
very simple. 

Our game, then, is to win four of these 
' plaques ' every day, but we do not try to win 
them all at once, but one by one. As soon as 
we have succeeded in winning one unit we put 
it away in a separate pocket, rule off our score 
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The 4 Avant Dernier* 



and start afresh to win another. The winning 
of each and every 'plaque,' therefore, consti- 
tutes a distinct and separate operation. 

The question now arises : What chance are 
we to play on, and how are we to vary our 
stakes ? The first is not nearly so important as 
the second. 

If the system is really good it ought not to 
matter much upon what it is played, provided 
always that it be an even chance. At the same 
time experience has taught me that by far the 
best chance adapted to our system is what is 
commonly known as the 'avant dernier.' Thjs 

. Consists Of always backing the rnlnnr tfcit ram** 

o ut last but one. 

For example, if on arriving at our table the 
colours had come up 
R 

B 
R 
our first stake would be on the Black, and then, 
no matter what turned up, our next stake would 
be on the Red. 

In the same way if the table had run 
R 
R 
B 
our first stake would be on the Red, and our 
next on the Black. 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

By this means it will be seen that we get the 
advantage of all the long runs, on either colour, 
after the second 'coup,' and when the table 
runs intermittently Red, Black, Red, Black, we 
win every stake. 

For example, if there is a run of eight, either 
on the Red or Black, we shall win six bets 
running in either case; and in the same way 
if the table runs Red, Black, Red, Black, eight 
times running, we shall win six consecutive bets. 
The only two combinations that do not suit 
us are several runs of two and three in succes- 
sion, for if the table runs 
R 
R 
B 
B 
R 
R 
B 
B 
we shall lose every bet, and if it runs 
R 
R 
R 
B 
B 
B 
the Bank wins two bets to our one. 
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The 'Avant Dernier 1 



However, taking everything into considera- 
tion, you will see very few records of the tables 
in which after, say a hundred 'coups,' by our 
method of staking, the player would not have 
won nearly as many bets as the Bank. 

You will see records of a whole day's play, 
where Red has come up 50, 6o, and even 70 
times more than Black; but you will hardly 
ever see a record in which a player on the 
'avant dernier' would have lost fifty 'coups' 
. more than the Bank in the course of a day. 

We will assume, then, that we have a capital 
of ;£6oo, and that we have decided to play on 
the ' avant dernier,' and to make our unit five 
louis; we have also decided to be content to 
win four units per day. 

The best way to do this is to commence 
playing what are called ' flat stakes ' of one unit 
(that is to say, we stake one unit every ' coup '), 
and continue doing so until either we are one 
to the good, or the Bank has won ten units 
from us. 

The moment we are on the right side we slip 



I the ' plaque ' we have won into our waistcoat 

pocket, rule off our score on the score-sheet, 
and start afresh to try and win another one. 

If, however, the Bank wins ten from us before 
we have won one from them, we then double 

\ our unit and continue playing flat stakes of two 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

units until we have got back all our losses, when 
we once more go back to stakes of one unit. 

In the event of the Bank still continuing to 
win, as soon as our score reaches - 30—/. e. as 
soon as the Bank has won ten stakes of two 
units more than ourselves — we then raise the 
unit to three ' plaques ' (fifteen louis), and con- 
tinue playing flat stakes of three until we have 
got all our losses back. 

In the same way, should the ill luck still con- 
tinue, we should raise the unit to four, when the 
score showed us to be - 60, and to five units when 
the score reached - 100. 

By this means it will be seen that in the event 
.of our having good luck at first, the stance is 
quickly over, and we retire from the contest with 
a win of twenty louis. But, should luck be against 
us at the start, we shall soon recoup our losses, 
when it comes over to our side, and in the event 
of several ' zeros ' having appeared in the course 
of play, we may eventually only have to win one 
or two units, instead of the prescribed four. 

If the stance be a short one, it will probably be 
found that we have won more bets than the Bank, 
but if we start by losing, and subsequently become 
winners, it will generally be found that the Bank 
has won more bets than ourselves. 

For, supposing the Bank to start by getting 
ten bets ahead of us, we can get all our losses 

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BlundeU'5 System 



back by winning five ; and if they get twenty 
bets ahead of us, it only takes us ten to recoup ; 
and therein lies the strength of the system. 

If we have good luck at first, we retire before 
it has time to change, and if we have bad luck 
at the start, by, means of our system we are 
enabled to see it out, and get our losses back as 
soon as it changes. 

I don't for a moment affirm that the system is 
infallible with a capital of ;£6oo 1 The more 
capital you have to fall back upon, the greater 
the certainty of success, but from what I have 
seen of the game, it seems to me to be very long 
odds on the player who has this amount of capital 
behind him. 

This, then, was the system that Blundell had 
shown to Frank Curzon, and which the latter 
had found to be so entirely satisfactory. 

Frank started by playing it in louis, to win 
five units per day, with a capital of ^200, and 
after testing it for a week, he increased his 
capital to ^300, and played it with a unit of 
two louis. 

He now proposed that we should each put up 
^300, and that I should accompany him to 
Monte Carlo and play it with a unit of five 
louis. 

He showed me all his figures for the last five 
years, comprising altogether about fifty days' 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

play. It seems that in all his experience, he 
had only twice got into dangerous figures, and 
had to play with four times his unit. 

On one of these occasions he had to remain 
at the tables for nearly 300 ' coups/ and was at 
one moment as much as eight-four units out of 
pocket, but the luck then veered round, and he 
slowly got all his losses back. In this case he 
was not even obliged to continue until the score 
was quite square, as there was an amount of 
about ten units already standing to the credit of 
•Zero Fund.' 

It looked almost too good to be true, and 
if I had not known Frank to be perfectly 
reliable, I should hardly have believed his 
story. 

It is a well-known fact that gamblers lie, like 
fishermen, but here in his figures, evidently 
worked at the tables, was unquestionable proof 
of all he had told me. One is so accustomed 
to hear it laid down that it is practically impos- 
sible to win at Monte Carlo, that one naturally 
doubts an assertion to the contrary, until one 
sees positive proofs. 

When I came to Frank's rooms, the idea of 
accompanying him to Monte Carlo never entered 
my mind, now I had half a mind to go. 

The fact of the matter was, that I had just 
come into a legacy of ^500, and had determined 
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Frank's Experiences 

> to give it a chance in a West Australian mining 

gamble. 

On Frank's showing, it was five to one on 
Monte Carlo turning up trumps, and if it -did, 
I could still give Westralia a chance on my 
return. 

"Ill think it over and let you know to-morrow," 
I said. 

"All right," said Frank, as he opened the front 
door to let me out. 

The weather was simply disgusting, it was 
raw and cold, a thick yellow fog had come on 
since dinner, and men were parading Piccadilly 
with torches. 

" I don't think I need keep you waiting," I 
said, "the English climate has settled the ques- 
tion ; I have decided to come and try my luck 
with you in the ' Sunny South/ " 

" Right you are," said Frank, " we will discuss 
all our plans to-morrow." 



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CHAPTER III 

Preparations for Monte Carlo— Bicycles on the Riviera — 
The Touring Club de France — Smith's Bank — Casino 
Customs— 'The Viatique'— Press Subsidies— Black- 
mailers defeated. 

"You must allow me to take command of 
this expedition," said Frank, when I met him 
next day by appointment, "and if you will 
permit me, I will proceed to give you an idea 
of our plan of campaign. 

" We intend to combine business with pleasure, 
and the length of our business hours will depend 
entirely upon our good or bad fortune. With 
ordinary good luck you should not find them 
irksome. At the commencement they will 
doubtless be pleasurable and exciting, but the 
novelty will soon wear off, and then you will 
find our work becoming monotonous and 
tiresome. 

"We must regard the gambling as serious 
business, for our pleasure will depend upon it 
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The Touring Club de France 

Outside 'the Rooms' we shall do our best to 
enjoy ourselves as much as possible. 

" It is no use economizing on a pleasure trip, 
and any. one wishing to travel ' on the cheap ' 
had better give Monaco a very wide berth. 
You get the best of everything there, if you are 
prepared to pay for it cheerfully, but it is the 
last place in the world in which to worry about 
petty items of expenditure. 

" We shall, therefore, take first return tickets, 
go down as luxuriously, as possible, live like 
\ princes as long as the system works, and come 

I back in the same style, if we defeat the Bank. 

i If not, we must dispense with the ' luxe ' on 

the return journey. 

"We shall take down our 'bikes,' and I'll 
guarantee that you will know all the nice rides 
within easy reach of Monte Carlo before you 
return." 

Frank then explained to me that he had 
written in course of the day to get me elected 
to the Touring Club de France, of which he is 
a member. 

This is an institution to which every cyclist 
going abroad should belong. The subscription 
is only five shillings per annum, and it is well 
worth the money. They send you, gratis, a 
very pretty- badge (which can be worn in your 
cap) and a card of Identification. On present- 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

ing these at any Custom-house on the French 
frontier, you are treated with the greatest 
courtesy, and are subjected to none of the 
annoyances to which an ordinary traveller with 
a cycle has to submit. 

If you don't know a member to propose you, 
write to the President, 5 Rue Coq H^ron, Paris, 
stating your full name, profession, and address, 
with your clubs (if any), and giving two refer- 
ences ; send him a postal order for five shillings, 
and the chances are you will be elected within 
a fortnight 

The Club supplies, if required, at very moderate 
prices, road-books and maps for the whole of 
France, giving full particulars as to the routes, 
hotels, etc., and any one intending to ' bike ' in 
the neighbourhood of Monte Carlo should 
provide himself with their publications for the 
departments of the Alpes Maritimes and The 
Var. 

Another very excellent map is that of ' The 
Riviera' (Sud-Est), published by the Libraire 
Neal, 248 Rue Rivoli, Paris, and doubtless 
procurable in London, as it is priced on the 
cover in English money, one shilling and 
sixpence. 

I have often been asked by friends, what is 
the best way to take a bicycle out to the Riviera, 
and what it costs. I can only say that it is just 
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Hints to Cyclists 



as easy for a member of the Touring Club to 
take a machine out to Monte Carlo, as it is to 
take one from London to Inverness, and it 
probably runs less risk on the way. 

On no account bother about a crate of any 
sort or kind ; they give a lot of trouble, and 
greatly increase the expense. The most I would 
advise you to do, is to have the pedals removed, 
have the parts liable to rust lightly smeared over 
with vaseline, and wrapped round with calico or 
flannel Be careful to leave the wheels free to 
revolve, so that the machine can be wheeled 
about in the ordinary way. 

You will find the railway employ^ more con- 
siderate towards bicycles in France than they 
are in England, and there -is only a charge of 
one penny to book a machine from one end of 
the country to the other, provided that your 
luggage does not exceed the weight allowed by 
the Company. In the event of your luggage 
being over-weight, as it most likely will be, you 
will find it will cost you about 45 francs to take 
a ' bike ' out to Monte Carlo and back. 
( Fairly good machines can be hired on the 

^ spot, but most people prefer to ride their own, 

( and if you intend spending a fortnight abroad, 

and riding most days, you will not save any 
money by hiring. Be careful to see that your 
brake is in good condition before starting; it 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

will be fairly tested by some of the gradients 
you will encounter there, and an unreliable 
brake would mean positive danger in certain 
places. 

If you have any regard for your health, you 
must take plenty of exercise at Monte Carlo. 
Most people take none ; they order the richest 
dishes on the menu, over-eat themselves twice a 
day, remain in the poisonous atmosphere of the 
gambling-rooms for hours and hours at a stretch, 
and then wonder why they get out of sorts ! 

Frank's system was just the contrary. Weather 
permitting, he always had a good ride or walk 
during the day, ate a light lunch, and remained 
in l the Rooms ' as short a time as possible, and 
then always at the least crowded time, viz. from 
5.30 to 8 p.m., when all the French and Germans 
are having their dinner. We found that by 
following this r&gime, we were ready to sample 
the best dinner that Monte Carlo could provide 
at eight o'clock, and were generally able to do 
full justice to it 

We never sat up very late at night, as we 
generally had to be up pretty early in the 
morning; the result was that ten days of this 
delightfully healthy existence made different 
beings of us both. 

"We will settle to leave on December 21," 
said Frank ; "by this means we shall escape the 
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Smith's Bank 



Christmas holidays in London, and shall be 
able to stop in Monte Carlo over New Year's 
Day." 

"All right," I said, "III leave all the travel- 
ling arrangements to you, and am ready to start 



j any day that you care to fix." 

^ "Then you had better get your bankers to 

pay m £>Z 00 t0 the London agents of Smith's 
bank, Monte Carlo, for your credit there, so 
that when we arrive, we shall find our capital 
all ready at hand, and shall not have the bother 
or risk of taking it out with us. 

"Smith's bank is an English establishment," 
continued Frank, "where you will be treated 
with the greatest courtesy, and many a poor 
unfortunate punter can testify to their kindly 
assistance in the hour of need." 

There is a popular belief that if a player loses 
all his money at the tables, the Administration 
of the Casino will always provide him with 
funds to leave the place. This used to be done 
freely until about five years ago, when a new 
Board of Directors took office. These gentlemen 
at once proceeded to adopt a policy of rigid 
economy, little in keeping with the old traditions 

1 t>f the place. 

I Time was, when you could go to Monte 

/ Carlo, live like a fighting-cock at the H6tel de 

I Paris for far less than it must have cost them 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

to keep you ; you could hear some of the finest 
music in Europe, absolutely gratis, and if you 
lost all your money, you were promptly handed 
a ten-pound note, and bowed politely out of 
the place without any fuss. 

Now, if you drink champagne for dinner, you 
can't live in the Principality under about £4 a 
day : for four months in the height of the season 
the free concerts are almost suspended, and the 
orchestra utilized for Operas, for which they 
charge you twenty francs for a seat : if you win 
at the tables the croupiers are bothering you all 
day long for gratuities, and if you lose all your 
money, well, you've got yourself into a mess, 
and you may get yourself out of it, for all 
they care. If you apply to the Administration, 
you have first got to swear that you have lost 
over ^300 ; they will then take you round the 
Rooms like a criminal, in order that the croupiers 
at the tables where you have played may identify 
you and confirm your statement. 

If the result of this investigation is satisfactory, 
the signatures of two directors must be obtained 
before anything further can be done. After this 
you are photographed, and once more taken 
round to be shown to all the doorkeepers, who 
are then given orders not to admit you any 
more. Next, you have to sign a promissory 
note for the amount of your travelling expenses, 
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Press Subventions 



and instead of giving you the money, you are 
told that an employ^ of the establishment will 
meet you at the station at such and such an 
hour, and hand you a second-class ticket to 
your destination. 

The consequence is, that rather than submit 
| to all these indignities, most people prefer to 

visit Messrs. Smith and Co., who can get you 
out funds from any part of the United Kingdom 
in a few hours* time, provided you can prove 
your identity, and have credit at home. 

After the music-loving public and the cleaned- 
out punters, the next people to suffer from the 
economies of the new Board were the repre- 
sentatives of the Press. 

It was always a recognized thing that the 
Press had to be squared, and as much as 
^30,000 a year used . to be given away in 
subventions. 

There was a regular list kept of the different 
amounts to be paid at the beginning of each 
winter season, to the various local and Paris 
papers, and it was an understood thing that 
every paper on the list undertook to suppress all 
accounts of scandals and suicides in Monte 
Carlo. 

I believe it was a fact that one of the most 
prominent of the Paris ' dailies ' drew a big 
sum annually on these conditions, and also 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

undertook to insert a paragraph on the front 
page^ whenever the weather was particularly 
disagreeable in Paris, to the effect that the sun- 
shine on the Riviera was * merveilleux,' and 
the temperature at Monte Carlo 65 in the 
shade! 

The proprietor of the same paper is reported 
to have sent his card up to the Director- 
General of the Casino one evening, informing 
him that he was in Monte Carlo for a few hours, 
and would like to amuse himself : would they 
kindly send him down 10,000 francs to play with? 
Having been duly handed the money he went 
into the Rooms, lost about 500 francs, and 
departed by the next train, leaving a polite 
message of thanks for the so-called loan, which 
of course they did not dare to reclaim from 
him. 

Eventually this species of blackmail by the 
Press grew to such dimensions, that the Admin- 
istration, like the proverbial worm, was forced to 
turn. 

Fresh newspapers used to spring up at Nice 
every winter, and armies of newspaper pro- 
prietors, editors* and reporters called upon the 
Casino authorities annually, asking for various 
sums as hush-money. 

But the climax was reached when a Company 
was formed at Nice, with the sole object of 
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Blackmailing the Casino 

blackmailing the Gambling Establishment. 
They rented a plot of ground in one of the most 
frequented thoroughfares of the town, close to 
the Railway-station, on which they erected an 
enormous hoarding, about fifty feet high and 
fifty yards long. On this were depicted the 
scandals of Monte Carlo. You saw the gaily- 
dressed crowd thronging up the steps of the 
Casino, then the scene changed to night, and 
you saw the ruined gambler coming out with a 
lddk of desperation on his face and a revolver in 
his hand. He shoots himself, and the next 
picture depicts his widow and children dis- 
covering his body by moonlight on the terrace. 
The last picture* and the largest of the series, 
! was the interior of the Palace of Monaco ; the 

! Prince was seated on his throne, with the 

i Princess by his side, whilst the Casino employes 

\ were bringing in bags and bags of gold and 

• laying them at his Highnfcss's feet ! 

; As soon as the show was ready, the Admin- 

{ istration were duly invited to inspect the 

exhibition; and were told that it would be taken 
( down on payment of 100,000 francs ! 

\ As they did not jump at this generous 

[ proposal, the Company had men stationed all 

down the street in which the pictures stood, 
f distributing handbills drawing attention to them 

f and recounting many harrowing occurrences 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

which were supposed to have taken place in 
Monte Carlo within the last year or so. 

Still the Casino did not • rise,' and the end of 
it was, that the blackmailers went bankrupt, and 
their works of art were seized by the creditors 
and confiscated. 

It was also the custom to give a banquet to 
the leading Press representatives on the night 
of the great Pigeon Shooting competition,- and 
the story goes that every invited guest, on 
taking his place, found a thousand-franc note 
artfully concealed in his napkin ! 

It was doubtless easier for them to write of 
the admirable arrangements made for the comfort 
of visitors and the invariable courtesy shown by 
the management, etc, etc., after a dinner at which 
such liberality prevailed. 

But now all this has been done away with, 
the Press subventions have been reduced to less 
than half the original figure, and the amount 
thus expended is looked upon purely as an 
advertisement, and not as hush-money. 

The Casino has either become more inde- 
pendent, or has found that the Press has grown 
to such dimensions of late years that it is 
impossible to deal with it as formerly. 



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CHAPTER IV 

Hints for the Journey— The Train de Luxe— The 
Yankee and his distinguished Card-sharper — Climate 
( of Monte Carlo — Ciro and 'Ciro's Restaurant — Lunch 

j at Ciro's— First Day's Play. 

i The only way to travel to Monte Carlo expedi- 

j tiously and with comfort is by the Train de 

( Luxe. This is a vestibuled train composed 

i entirely of sleeping cars, and a restaurant car, 

j which runs right through from Calais to Vinti- 

\ mille — on the Italian frontier — about three times 

| a week. The places are limited, and should be 

i booked at the office of the International Sleep- 

{ ing Car Co., in Cockspur Street, at least ten 

i days or a fortnight in advance. If your party 

- consists of either two or four, you can secure 

•', an entire compartment, and can either take 

/ your own provisions with you, or take your 

meals in the restaurant car. 

| There is no trouble with the Custom-house 

i if you travel by this service ; the hand-luggage 

J * 37 

i 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

being examined on your arrival at Calais, and 
the heavy baggage in the luggage-van en route. 
You will not find them exacting at either place, 
and Frank and I easily smuggled through 400 
cigarettes, and a couple of hundred cigars. 

A little civility backed up by a five-franc 
piece here and there, goes a long way in France. 
Tip every one, and tip liberally, was our motto, 
and we met with politeness and courtesy every- 
where. 

We left Victoria at 9 a.m., had a very good 
crossing, considering the time of the year, and 
arrived at Monte Carlo punctually at 9.45 
the next morning. This is not bad travelling, 
when you come to consider that the distance is 
close on 950 miles. 

The supplementary fare for the Train de 
Luxe is £4 19s. lod. over and above the first- 
class ticket ; this is of course absurdly high, 
but all things considered . it is well worth the 
extra money. „ 

Our train was quite full, the passengers being 
almost entirely composed of M.P.s, City men, 
and barristers going out for the Christmas 
holidays. There were several card-parties going 
op, principally amongst the barristers, and Franjc 
and I took a hand in a whist-party. 

This reminds me of rather a good story of a 
very distinguished member of the legal pro- 
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I 

Yankee and 'Card-sharper* 

fession, who is as well known at Newmarket 
and other sporting resorts as he is in the 
Queen's Bench Division. He is likewise well 
i known as a first-class card-player, and is never 

\ happier than when so engaged. 

j Last year an American friend of Frank's 

i was travelling from Paris to Nice by the night 

«) Rapide, and found himself alone in a compart- 

ment with our legal friend. 

They had not been en route more than two or 
three hours before X. (as we will call him) 
j proposed a little game of cards, just to pass 

away the time. The American, having seen his 
name on his handbag, and thinking at the time 
that he looked all right, acquiesced, and they 
| -started at 8.30 p.m. to play hearth. When they 

j arrived at Nice at nine the next morning, they 

were still playing, and when they came to settle 
up the Yankee found himself to be a loser of 
about ^30. He then took it into his head 
\ that he had been swindled by a card-sharper, 

I and immediately on reaching his hotel, wrote a 

( letter to the Paris edition of the New York 

1 Herald^ narrating his experiences, and warning 

people against playing cards with " a most re- 
spectable-looking old gentleman, masquerading 
under the name of X., as he was undoubtedly 
\ a professional, travelling card-sharper ! " 

Frank, who came to lunch with him — having 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

seen X. arriving at Monte Carlo an hour before 
— was only just in time to prevent the letter 
from being posted, and was easily able to con- 
vince his friend, by a minute description, that 
he had in reality been playing all night with a 
very eminent personage indeed ! 

On our arrival it was pouring with rain, and 
as we had discovered on the way out that most 
of our fellow-travellers were also going to our 
hotel, we at once made a rush for the M&ropole 
'bus. The hotel is quite close to the station, 
but when it does rain on the Riviera, there are 
no half-measures, and one would have been 
fairly drenched in three minutes. 

It so happened that this rain was the luckiest 
thing that could possibly have occurred. We 
had not intended to take any exercise on the 
day of our arrival, and were consequently de- 
lighted to see the roads being well washed by a 
thorough good downpour. 

" If it is fine to-morrow," said Frank, " the 
surface will be just perfect for 'biking* by ten 
o'clock," and so in fact it was. 

It is rare to have rain at this time of the year 
at Monte Carlo, and for the remainder of our 
visit the weather was simply perfect 

Blundell, who met us at the station, told me 
that the most reliable months of the whole 
year are November and December. It is then 
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( 



Climate of Monte Carlo 

bright and sunny, and the air is dry and 
bracing. 

In January and February the weather is very 
uncertain and liable to 'Mistral' — a strong 
north-west wind which often continues for several 
days. 

In March you get a hot sun but very cold 
east winds, which makes the climate most 
treacherous. April is nice but often cold, and 
in May you are liable to the ' Sirocco ' — a hot 
enervating wind, which . comes straight across 
the Mediterranean from the Great Sahara. . 

However, if you wish to see the country in 
all its beauty, you should certainly pay it a visit 
about May 10. Every house is then a blaze of 
colour, clothed with masses- of pink and red 
ivy-geranium, varied occasionally by the orange 
of the nasturtium, and the purple of the lovely 
bougainvillea : every hedge is a bower of roses, 
the may and laburnum are in full bloom, and 
the whole air is laden with the perfume of 
the daphne. If you go out into the country, 
every field and every bank is a flower-garden, 
whilst at night the.firelies flit around, and the 
nightingales sing you to sleep. May is beautiful 
enough in England, it's true, but on the Riviera 
ifs like fairy-land, and must be seen to be fully 
realized. 

Having arrived at the H6tel M&ropole, and 
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ten Days at Monte Carlo 

been duly introduced to Monsieur Varnier, the 
genial manager, we were escorted to our rooms, 
which had been reserved by Frank, about a 
fortnight in advance. They were on the third 
floor, facing full south, looking right on to the 
Casino Gardens, with the Mediterranean below.. 

The sun came streaming into our bedrooms 
at about seven o'clock every morning, and the 
view from our windows — which we were fortun- 
ate enough to see on two occasions — of the full 
moon rising out of the sea from behind Cap 
Martin, and throwing a great silvery path across 
the Bay of Roquebrune, was as fine as anything 
I have ever seen. 

" We have just got a couple of hours," said 
Frank, "to make ourselves comfortable, and 
then we will go round and have lunch at Ciro's. 
We shall then soon see who is at Monte 
Carlo." * 

Ciro's restaurant, which is the most fashion- 
able resort at luncheon-time, is most conveni- 
ently situated for visitors to the M&rbpole, as 
it is actually next door, and being on a covered 
terrace, one does not have- to face the rain at 
all on a wet day. 

Ciro himself is quite a character, and is 
certainly one of the most successful men that I 
know. Everything that he touches seems to 
turn to gold. 

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Ciro aftd his Restaurant 

K[e is a Neapolitan by birth, and has been 
everything in . his time, from bottle-washer to 
cook, and from bar-tender to restaurant pro- 
prietor. He served his apprenticeship in 
America, and was for some time at Delmonico's. 
He then came back to Europe, and it was a 
lucky day for him when he accepted the post 
of bar-tender at a little American bar on the 
Place du Casino at Monte Carlo. 

From that day he began to go steadily ahead, 
and though it is not much more than ten years 
ago, he is now the sole proprietor of a gopd- 
sized bar — which is managed by his brother — 
and of one of the most fashionable restaurants 
in the world, to which he and Madame Ciro 
give their whole attention. 

Ciro's motto is ' The very best,' and he cer- 
tainly endeavours to live up to it. He says : 
"Some people say that my prices are too high, but 
if you want the best of everything, you've got to 
pay for it I buy only the very best things in 
the market, and ' primeurs ' at no matter what 
cost." 

His charges certainly are rather heavy at times, 
but I personally have always found him very 
reasonable, and he contrives to keep his cus- 
tomers in a good humour by his witty replies 
and his funny English. 

The following is an example of what he can 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

do. Frank and I went in to have an egg-nog 
at about ten o'clock one morning. The drinks 
were duly mixed, and disposed of. "How 
much?/' we asked. "Five francs," said the 
bar-man. So we sent for Ciro, and Frank 
gently remonstrated with him. "We've had 
two egg-nogs, Ciro," he said. " I suppose they 
contain two eggs at about -twenty centimes each ; 
we will put the old brandy at one franc fifty, 
and the milk and the other etceteras will bring 
the cost up to just two francs ; don't you think 
you are making rather an exorbitant profit on 
the transaction ? " 

" Yes, but you see," explained Ciro, " I know 
if you drink that now, you won't want so much 
lunch, so I'm bound to charge customers a lot 
for a drink like that ! " 

This ingenious explanation being greeted 
with roars of laughter from the bystanders, we 
had nothing left to do but to pay up and look 
pleasant 

But on one occasion Ciro himself came off 
second best. He had been interviewed by a corre- 
spondent of the New York Herald, on the subtle 
art of making cocktails, about which there had 
recently been some correspondence in the 
paper. Ciro was full of his subject — only 
metaphorically, of course — and showed proper 
scorn for the methods of some of the corre- 



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Monsieur Ciro 



spondents, who, he said, were evidently London 
and Paris bar-men, "most of whom know no more 
about mixing drinks than you do, and ought to 
be still washing glasses behind the bar ; but I 
learnt my business with Jerry Thomas." He 
then proceeded to give his own recipe for the 
proper manufacture of a cocktail. 

When the interview duly appeared in the 
Herald^ one of his former employe's, who had 
started a bar of his own in Paris, was very 
indignant at the aspersions cast on the Paris bar- 
men, and wrote to the Editor as follows : 

" Dear Sir, 

" Don't you believe what Ciro says ; he 
never was with Jerry Thomas in his life, and as 
for ' his own ' recipe, he copied it from a book 
which he keeps in a drawer behind the bar ! 
" Yours respectfully, 

" George. 

"Rue etc., etc., Paris." 

It will be a long time before Ciro hears the 
last of that book, ' in the drawer behind the 
bar.' 

At luncheon-time at Giro's, on a wet day, 

you can see all the notabilities in Monte Carlo 

compressed into a space of about twenty yards 

square. We had luckily sent Blundell down 

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Teh Day* at Monte Carlo 

early to engage a table, for when we arrived the 
place was crammed full. 

At a table in the window, the Grand Dukfe 
Michael and the Countess Torby were enter- 
taining the Duke and Duchess of Connaught 
and the Crown Prince and Princess of Roumania. 
At the next table the Lord Chief Justice and 
Lady Russell were breakfasting with their son 
and daughter-in-law, and one or two members 
of the Junior Bar. 

Next to them Mr. George Edwardes and Mr. 
Jewitt were lunching with Sam Loates and 
Sloan, the little American jockey, who was a 
most comical sight sitting next to the portly 
form of * Gaiety George.' A well-known 
Lombard Street banker had a cheery party of 
ladies, whilst amongst his male guests we made 
out Mr. 4 Charley' Bulpett and Mn C F. 
GUI. 

The legal and political element was very 
strongly represented. Mr. Carson and his wife 
were in one corner of the room, whilst the 
Speaker of the House of Commons and itrs. 
Gully had a small party in another. Sit William 
Walrond, the popular Conservative Whip, was 
talking to Lord Onslow. 

Art was represented by Mr. Charles Wertheiitfer 
and Mr. Morland Agnew ; the Stage by Mtes 
Miriam Clements, 'La feelle Juniori,' and 
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LUnch at Ciro's 



Fanny Ward ; Music by Tosti and Sir Arthur 
Sullivan ; and Sport by Messrs. Douglas Baird 
and Harry McCalmont. 

London Society was also well to the fore, and 
amongst the best-known we made out Mr. and 
Mrs. Wm. McEwan, Captain and Mrs. ' Ronny' 
Greville, Lord and Lady Wolverton, Lord and 
Lady ' Algy ' Lennox, the Duke and Duchess 
of Leeds, Sir John Willoughby and Mr. 'Monty' 
Guest. If you add to all these, a sprinkling 
of superbly dressed demi '- mondaines> some 
foreign notabilities, a few barristers, City men, 
and stockbrokers, you will have a very fair idea 
of Ciro's restaurant during the Monte Carlo 
season. 

We found Blundell a most useful guide, he 
knew everything and everybody. We left the 
ordering of the lunch to him, and right well he 
did us. We were four altogether, as I had 
invited a City friend. The menu was as follows : 

Hors d'GEuvres varies. 

CEufs pochcs Grand Due. 

Mostele a l'Anglaise. 

Volaille en Casserole a la Fermiere. 

Patisserie. 

Fromage. 

-Cafe'. 

Vins et Liqueurs. 

Chateau Carbonnieux, 189 1. 

Fine Champagne, 1846. 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

The Mostfele is a speciality of this part of the 
world, and is the most prized of the Mediterra- 
nean fish. It is very like a whiting, only much 
more delicate. Split open, filled with butter 
and bread-crumbs, and fried, they are delicious. 
I also recommend to your notice the Ch&teau 
Carbonnieux ; it is a very superior Graves, and 
should be slightly iced. It mixes well with any 
mineral water, and is the nicest breakfast wine 
that I know. 

To give you an idea of Ciro's prices, I append 
the bill : 

Ciro's Restaurant, Monte Carlo. 



4 Couverts . - . 

Beurre Isigny 

Hors d'CEuvres varies . 

6 CEnfs poches Grand Due 

Mostele Anglaise 

Volaille Casserole 

Patisserie, Gateaux 

Fromage Brie 

4 Caft filtre 

4 Fine Champagne, 1846 

I Magnum Carbonnieux, 1 89 1 



Total 



fcs. 

2 
I 
2 

4 

8 

12 

2 
2 

4 
8 

61 



5o 
5o 



Seeing that we were four persons, and that the 
coffee, wines, and liqueurs alone come to 27 
francs, I think you will agree with me that the 
eatables are not overcharged, considering that 
this is one of the best restaurants in Europe. 
We found that when we were alone, if we avoided 
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General Rules for the System 

expensive wines and liqueurs, we could lunch 
for 7 francs 50 cents., and dine for 10 francs a 
head. 

After a cigar, we paid a visit to Smith's Bank 
next door, drew out our capital of ^600, and 
then strolled across to the concert at the Casino. 
\ This lasted till 4. 1 5, and at 5 p.m. we made our 

first onslaught on the Bank. 

It may here be as well to remind the reader 
of the General Rules for playing the System. 

1. Always back the colour that came up last 
but one. * Zero,' representing neither colour, 
is treated as no * coup.' 

2. When 'Zero 1 appears, exercise the right of 
taking half your stake off the table, and 
place it to a separate account. The total 
amount to the credit of 'Zero Fund' is 
added to your profits at the end of the day. 
The * coup ' is scored as a loss. 

3. When the score reaches — 

- 10 increase your unit to 2 

I - 3° » » » 3 

- 60 „ „ „ 4 
- 100 „ „ „ 5 

and continue playing with the increased 
stakes until all losses are retrieved. . Then 
re-commence staking one unit. 

4. Continue playing until you can show a net 
profit of Fes. 400 or over. 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

We determined to play every day at the same 
table, and after looking round carefully, came to 
the conclusion that the table in the third room, 
on the right-hand side, appeared to be the least 
frequented. After looking on for about a quarter 
of an hour, we secured two seats, and the table 
ran as follows : l 

FIRST DAY'S PLAY. 
Contractions in Tables : St. * Stake, L=Lose, W«Win. 



Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 




H 
9 

9 
21 
36 

9 


No Stake 
No Stake 
St. 1 L 
1 L 


4 

2 


12 
3 

32 

14 
19 


-6 
1 W 


33 
26 


1 W 




-2 
1 L 






-4 
1 L 




-?l 






-5 
1 L 




-4 
1 W 


-6 
1 W 


11 


"?L 


-?L 


15 


-4 
I L 


-6 
iL 




-5 
iL 


-7 
1 W 




-6 


-6 



1 N.B. — We commence staking on tbe third spin. 
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First 


Day's Play 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


4 


3 


-6 
I L 


22 

4 
6 

24 
10 




-8 
2 W 


17 


-7 
1 L 


-6 
2 W 




-8 
1 L 


-4 
2 W 






26 


"?w 


— 2 
2 W 




O 




-8 
1 L 


I w 


Z. 


+ 1 






-9 

1 L 




33 


11 




1 w 




- 10 

St. 2W 




35 


10 








-8 


1 w 



Zero Fund. 
Fes. 50 on 14th coup 
50 „ 21st „ 



Summary. 

Coups played 
Won . . 
Lost . . 

Units won . 



30 
14 
16 

3 



3 units @ fcs. 100 = fcs. 300 

Add Zero Fund . . . 100 

Total won . 400 



It will be seen, that on the 23rd 'coup' the 
score being — 10, we increase our unit to 2, 
and on the 28th spin, having retrieved all our 
losses, we reduce it again to 1. Zero having 
turned up twice, we take off fifty francs each 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

time, and place it to a separate account, reckoning 
the ' coup ' as lost 

We now come in for a nice run on the Black, 
and after three more spins, we are able to retire, 
having won three units, there being now ioo 
francs to the credit of 'Zero Fund.' The stance 
lasted just three-quarters of an hour. 

After this, we dressed and dined quietly at 
the M&ropole, and after one more stroll across 
to ' the Rooms ' to inspect the evening toilettes, 
we retired early to bed, to sleep off the effects of 
the journey down. 



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CHAPTER V 

First Bicycle Ride — La Crlmaillere — La Turbie — Corniche 
Road— Valley of the Paillon— Eze— Cap Martin- 
Lunch at Cap Martin Hotel — Second Day's Play. 

We both agreed not to make our rides too long 
at the commencement of our visit, as neither of 
us had been doing any ' biking ' for the last two 
months, and we wished to get gradually accus- 
tomed to the hills. 

" We will go up to La Turbie by the train," 
said Frank, " take a ride of about four miles in 
the direction of Nice, then turn back and run 
down to Cap Martin for lunch. After lunch we 
will ride quietly home." 

The ancient village of La Turbie stands just 
behind Monte Carlo, at an altitude of about 
1 700 feet, but it is made charmingly accessible 
by means of the little mountain railway, known as 
' La Cr^maillere,' which takes you up in exactly 
twenty minutes; fare, second-class, 2.30 francs, 
and no charge for bicycles. Take my advice and 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

go second, as the first-class compartments are 
stuffy. 

The gradient at the start is most alarming, and 
one cannot help wondering what would happen 
should the engine break down, but after the first 
half-mile it becomes all plain sailing. 

We stop once on the way up, at the pretty 
little station of Bordina, and have two minutes 
to admire the fine view below us, and the 
station-master's charming flower-garden. 

It is just below this that the International 
Sleeping Car Company are building another of 
their large hotels ; they have chosen a beautiful 
site, well sheltered from the wind, and doubtless 
the establishment, when finished, will be as 
popular as their Riviera Palace at Nice. The 
inauguration takes place, I believe, on January 
i st, 1899. 

On arriving at the top, about fifty yards from 
the station, is a semi-circular sort of balcony, 
built right on the edge of the precipice, and from 
here the finest view is obtained. 

Monaco and Monte Carlo lie right at our feet, 
and it looks as if one could easily throw a stone 
either on to the Casino or into the pretty little 
harbour, which can now boast of three or four 
steam-yachts. To the north-east is the pictur- 
esque village of Roquebrune, nestling against the 
side of the mountain, while to the east are Cap 
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La Turbie 



Martin and Mentone, with Bordighera in the 
distance. 

It was from this spot, about two years ago, 
that Frank saw a great race between the 
Britannia, Ailsa, and Satanita, and from his 
description it must have been a truly wonderful 
sight. The Bay of Roquebrune filled with thirty 
or forty small raters — looking in the distance like 
toy ships on the Serpentine — the three big yachts 
tearing through their midst with a fine breeze 
behind them, and the sun shining on the harbour, 
now full of steam-yachts of every nationality, all 
dressed with bunting in honour of the occasion. 
From this commanding spot, with the aid of a 
good glass, one could follow every detail of a 
yacht race. 

We reluctantly tear ourselves away, and enter- 
ing the village of La Turbie, turn to the left, 
and ride right through the village. The road 
descends as far as a bridge over a small gorge, 
and then steadily rises for about three kilometres. 
I may here mention, that to bring kilometres to 
miles (roughly), you multiply by 6 and divide 
by 10; in other words, ten kilometres equal 
approximately six English miles. 

We now get a fine view of the ancient and 

interesting old village of Eze, "which stands right 

on the top of a cone-shaped mountain, below us 

on our left. We are here at the very highest 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

point of the Corniche Road, roughly speaking 
about 2000 feet above the sea. 

Should you wish to explore the village of Eze, 
I advise you to leave your ' bikes ' out of the 
question, train from Monte Carlo to Eze-sur-Mer, 
and walk up from there by the steep footpath to 
the village. This takes about an hour and a 
quarter. You can afterwards walk from there to 
La Turbie, and descend by the railway to Monte 
Carlo. This makes a very nice little excursion 
on a fine cool day. 

The day being clear, we now get a fine 
panorama to the west, which we were unable to 
see from La Turbie, owing to the mountain, 
known as the TSte de Chien, intercepting the 
view. Beaulieu and Cap St. Jean lie at our feet, 
Villefranche and Nice beyond, with the beautiful 
Esterel range away in the far distance. 

From this point the road descends the whole 
way to Nice, and the first mile and a half is as 
pretty a bit of ' coasting ' as I know of anywhere, 
except perhaps from the top of Hinde Head, on 
the Portsmouth Road, down into Godalming. 
The descent is gradual, the road wide, and the 
surface absolutely perfect. After a run of about 
six minutes, with our feet up all the way, we 
arrive at our destination. 

We pass two auberges, one on the right-hand 
side of the road, and the other on the left, and 
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View front the Corniche Road 

it is here that the carriage-road branches off to 
Eze. We continue for a hundred yards or so 
until we come to another road leaving the 
Corniche, on the right-hand side 3 this is only a 
short cut to Nice and joins the main road again, 
about two miles below. It is too steep and too 
rough to be rideable with comfort 

But here was the view that Frank had brought 

me to see, and it certainly repaid us for climbing 

the ascent from La Turbie. The obstruction to 

our right being now removed, the whole of the 

country to the north and north-west comes 

suddenly into view, and is* spread out like a map 

at our feet. The beautiful valley of the Paillon, 

with the little village of Trinity Victor, is imme- 

< diately below us, with the mountains behind, 

I rising gradually higher and higher and culmin- 

■> ating in a magnificent range of snow-clad peaks. 

On a bright clear day this is worth going miles 

( to see. 

I From here to the Cap Martin Hotel is just 

I about twenty kilometres, but about sixteen of it 

being downhill, one can ride it very easily in an 
hour and ten minutes. There is some safe 
'coasting' as far as La Turbie, but after that, I 
strongly advise you to keep your feet on the 
pedals. A girl on her honeymoon was nearly 
killed through reckless riding on this road only 
last year. 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

About nine kilometres after leaving La Turbie, 
the Corniche passes close under the village of 
Roquebrune, and joins the lower road from 
Monte Carlo to Mentone. About fifty yards 
from this junction, on the Mentone side, there 
is another very fine view. 

If you stand against the wall, facing the sea, 
you have got the whole of Cap Martin spread 
out at your feet, and can easily make out the 
Empress Eugenie's fine Villa Cyrnos, which is 
the fourth visible on the right-hand side, the 
first, belonging to Captain Wentworth, being 
almost hidden amongst the trees. On our right 
is a magnificent view of Monte Carlo, Monaco, 
and the T£te de Chien, and on our left the 
whole of Mentone is now visible. 

We continue down the hill towards Mentone, 
until we come to the Barracks, and then take 
the first turning to the right. This brings us on. 
to the sea front, and turning again to the right, 
we enter the Cap Martin Estate, and in five 
minutes time arrive at the hotel. 

This establishment, started about six years ago 
by Mr. Colvin White — the owner of Cap Martin 
—and a few friends, including Mr. Edward 
Smith, the Monte Carlo banker, has had a most 
phenomenal success. The Prince and Princess 
of Wales stopped there for some weeks the first 
year it was opened, and since that time it has 
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Cap Martin Hotel 



been honoured by Royalty of some sort every 
year. 

Mr. Ulrich, the popular manager, has been 
twice decorated by the Emperor of Austria, and 
it is reported that the chef knows more different 
ways of serving up eggs than any man in Europe. 
They give you a most excellent table (Thdte lunch, 
at separate tables, at a reasonable price. 

After lunch, and a stroll round the gardens, 
we started for home, and turning sharp to the 
left, on leaving the hotel, kept along the west 
side of the Cap, and passed the gates of the 
Empress's villa. The ride back to Monte Carlo 
takes about thirty-five to forty minutes ; the hills, 
with the exception of one very steep little bit, 
being mostly in the right direction. One has to 
ride carefully on entering the town, as the electric 
tramway has made the road rather dangerous for 
cyclists. 

On arriving at the M&ropole, we changed 
our clothes, had some tea, and then prepared 
for the business of the day. As it turned out, 
we were in for a considerably longer seance than 
on the previous day, but by means of the system 
and plenty of patience, we were returned 
victorious, after a struggle of rather more than 
two hours. 

The table ran as follows : 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 



SECOND DAY'S PLAY. 



Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


26 
17 


:. 


No Stake 

No Stake 

No Stake 

+ 1 W 


33 

28 
8 
IO 

33 
17 


23 

18 
21 
36 

34 

21 
I 


-4 
IL 


22 


-5 


31 




+ 1 W 


1 w 






3 
7 

25 

32 
27 

9 


Su 1 h 
1 L 


-4 
1 W 






4 


-2 
1 L 


~3 
iL 




8 


-3 
1 L 


-4 
1 W 






-4 
l L 


-3 
1 W 






24 


-5 
1 W 


— 2 

iL 






-4 
1 W 


-3 
iL 








"?L 


-4 
1 W 






11 


-4 
1 L 


-3 
iL 








1 W 


-4 
iL 






6 


-4 
I W 


"!l 








-3 
1 L 


-6 

iL 


10 






-4 


- 7 



[60] 



Second Day's Play 



Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


| Black. 


Red. 


Score. 




34 
9 

27 
16 

18 
12 


-7 
iL 


6 

8 

17 

3* 

13 

22 

17 


18 

34 
23 

5 

19 
32 


-20 
2L 




-8 
iL 


-22 
2 W 






20 


- 9 

I L 


-20 
2L 


15 


-10 
St.2L 


-22 
2 W 




-12 

2L 


-20 
2L 




-14 

2L 


-22 
2 W 


28 


-16 

2L 


-20 
2 W 




-18 

2 W 


-l8 
2L 


II 


-16 

2W 


-20 
2L 


4 


-14 
2L 


-22 
2L 


15 


-16 

2 W 


-24 
2L 




-14 
2L 


-26 
2W 




-I6 
2L 


-24 
2L 


10 


-18 

2L 


-26 

2 W 




-20 


-24 



[61] 



.-* v 



'}* 



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Ten Days 


at Monte Carlo 




Black. 


Red 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 




34 
9 

16 
19 

23 . 

7 
H 

19 


-24 
2 W 


29 
II 
8 

4 
24 
29 
22 
13 
24 

6 


30 
27 

25 
32 


-33 
3L 




-22 
2W 


-36 
3L 


20 


-20 
2L 


-39 
3W 




-22 
2 W 


-36 
3W 




-20 
2L 


-33 

3W 


IO 


-22 
2L 


-30 
3W 




-24 
2 W 


-27 
3W 


8 


-22 
2 W 


-24 

3W 


20 


-20 
2L 


-21 
3L 




-22 
2L 


-24 
3W 




-24 
2L 


-21 

3W 


15 


-26 
2L 


-18 
3W 


17 


-28 
2L 


-15 

3W 




-30 

St. 3 L 


-12 
3W 




-33 


- 9 



[62] 



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Google 







Second 


Day' 


s Play 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


2 


18 
r 


- 9 
3W 


28 


3 
36 


- 9 

3W 




- 6 
3L 


- 6 
3W 


2 


- 9 
3L 


- 3 
3W 


31 


-12 
3W 







- 9 





Zero Fund. 

Fes. 100 on 49th coup 
150 „ 86th „ 
250 



Summary. 

Coups played 90 

Won . . 41 

Lost . . 49 

Units won . 2 



2 units @ fcs. 100 = fcs. 200 
Add Zero Fund . . 250 

Total won . 450 



It will be seen that we win two units, the first 
two spins played, but after that we play 88 
'coups' without winning another. On the 31st 
' coup ' we increase our unit to 2, and on the 
69th — the score being - 30 — we increase to 3, and 
are at one time as much as 39 units to the bad. 
After this, a run of intermittence and a sequence 
63 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

of eight Blacks, followed by another intermittence, 
enables us to win back all our losses, and as 
there is a sum of 250 francs to the credit of 
'Zero account,' we are able to retire with a win 
of 450 francs. 



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I 

> CHAPTER VI 

Second Bicycle Ride — Monte Carlo to Nice — The Legend 
( of Sainte Demote — Beaulieu — Villefranche — The 

j 'London House' — Third' Day's Play — Concert at 

the Casino — The Monte Carlo Orchestra. 

The ride from Monte Carlo to Nice, by the 

lower road, is rather hilly, but the gradients are 

so good that a strong rider need not dismount at 

al). A rider of this calibre would take about an 

\ hour and a quarter from the Hotel Me'tropole 

[ to the Place Masslna, a distance of exactly 

I thirteen miles. 

j We, however, intend not only to walk up the 

/ steep places, but to stop occasionally to admire 

. the series of beautiful views which the road 

\ continually presents; we shall consequently 

( allow ourselves rather more than two hours. 

The Condamine Hill being now dangerous 
j on account of the Electric Tramway, we leave 

/ Monte Carlo by the upper road, across the 

Bridge of Sainte Devote. Below us, on the left, 
65 p 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

is the curiously situated little Chapel, which* 
owes its existence to the following romantic 
legend. 

Devote, a Christian by birth, lived in Corsica 
at the time of the persecution of the Christians, 
under the Emperors Diocletian and Maximilian. 
She was seized by the Roman Governor and 
called upon to offer sacrifices to the pagan gods, 
but as she stoutly refused, they put her to every 
conceivable torture, thinking to make her obey. 
All these she cheerfully endured, continuing to 
pray fervently, and to offer up thanks to God 
that the honour of martyrdom had been con- 
ferred upon her. 

At last, a voice from the clouds proclaimed 
that her prayers were heard, and a dove flew out 
of her mouth and soared heavenwards. Her 
body, which had been ordered by the Governor 
to be burnt, was rescued by two Christian priests 
during the night, who, with the assistance of a 
sailor named Gratian, embalmed it, placed it in 
a boat, and set sail for the coast of Africa. But 
a strong south wind sprung up, and drove them 
northwards. All night long they toiled and 
struggled against the elements, but it was useless, 
and with the utmost difficulty they kept them- 
selves afloat. 

At last Gratian, utterly exhausted, fell asleep, 
and during his slumber the spirit of the martyr 
66 



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Legend of Sainte Devote 

appeared to him: "Cease battling against the 
wind," she said, " the gale will soon abate. In 
the morning you will see a dove come out of 
my mouth, follow it to land, and wherever it 
alights, there bury my body.'' In the morning 
the dove duly made its appearance, and leading 
them into what is now the little harbour of 
Monaco, alighted on the spot where the Shrine 
stands. 

This being supposed to have occurred on 
January 27, that day is still kept as a religious 
festival in the Principality ; and a very pretty 
and interesting sight it is, to see the long solemn 
procession wending its way from the Cathedral 
at Monaco to the little Chapel under the 
railway bridge to do homage to the memory of 
the martyred saint. 

After leaving the bridge, the road continues 
4o descend for about one kilometre, until we 
come to the Cemetery, on our right, which 
stands at the extreme limit of the Principality. 
We now come to the frontier, and have a long 
ascent of about two kilometres to negotiate. 
The gradient, however, is not very severe, and 
it is quite rideable all the way. 

About half-a-mile from the Cemetery, we 

arrive outside Sir Edward Malet's new Chiteau, 

with its two imposing-looking Lodges, on the 

right-hand side of the road. We will here stop 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

for a moment to admire the lovely view behind 
us. This is one of the most picturesque views 
of the little Principality. 

The ' singular sea-girt rock ' of Monaco, with 
its old-world Palace and modern Cathedral, 
stands boldly out in the foreground, with 
part of Monte Carlo visible to the left, and the 
rugged mountains beyond ; the whole making 
up a most charming picture. 

We are now at the village of Cap d'Ail ; the 
Pigeon Shooting Ground is on our left, down by 
the sea. On our right we soon come to the 
enormous Villa Sanitas, formerly an hotel, but 
now used as a villa by the Countess van der 
Osten ; in April and May the walls are almost 
entirely hidden by masses of ivy-geranium, and 
the garden is a beautiful sight. 

Below us, on our left, a little further on, is the 
Eden Hotel, which has just been re-opened, 
after remaining closed for a great many years. 
It is under new management, and bids fair to 
become popular. About half-a-mile further up 
the hill on our right, is the charming Villa des 
Terrasses, which was occupied last year by the 
Dowager Empress of Russia and the young 
Cesarewitch. The latter, whose lungs were 
supposed to be in a very dangerous condition, 
used to sleep out on the verandah, covered in 
by an awning, all through the month of March. 
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Beaulieu 



His sojourn of three months in this Villa proved 
very beneficial to his health. 

A short distance further on we ride through 
two tunnels, and have now reached the top of 
the hill. From this point to the station of Eze 
is all on a descent. About a mile below the 
tunnels we cross a bridge, and just above it is 
the old Monastery of St. Laurent d'Eze, at 
present uninhabited — having been recently 
purchased, together with a large area of land 
behind, by Sir Edward Malet. 

From the station of Eze to the commence- 
ment of Beaulieu is almost on the flat, and then 
the road once more begins to rise. 

The first striking object that we meet with in 
Beaulieu is the imposing-looking Hotel Bristol, 
at present in the course of construction, under 
the auspices of Sir John Blundell Maple. 
Leaving this on our left, we ascend the road 
leading to Beaulieu station, and now have a fine 
view of Lord Salisbury's Villa 'La Bastide,' 
perched on the hill, just above the village, and 
looking like a large Swiss chalet. 

At Beaulieu station we turn to the left, and 
the road continues to rise gradually, until Ville- 
franche 'Harbour comes into view, when the 
gradient becomes .rather tiring, and the latter 
part of this hill had better be taken on foot. 
Below us, on the left, at the corner of the bay, 
is Mr. Harry McCalmont's new villa, with an 
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Teh Days at Monte Carlo 

unpronounceable name, but easily recognized by 
the white ensign floating on the turret. 

We mount our machines at the top of the 
hill, and can now ride straight on to Nice with- 
out again dismounting. The road descends 
sharply on to the Place d'Armes — where the 
crews of the men-of-war in the harbour may 
often be seen at drill — and then rises again, but 
with a very easy gradient. Two miles further 
on we. reach the top of the Mont Boron Hill, 
and from here there is a truly magnificent view 
of the entire town and environs of Nice. The 
old fashioned 'Port' and the Quai Lunel are 
just below us, backed by the Castle Hill; to the 
south-west is the entire length of the Promenade 
des Anglais, with the Esterel Range in the far 
distance, while to the west and north-west is 
the town of Nice, with Cimiez rising in the back- 
ground. The huge Regina Palace, where the 
Queen has spent the last two winters, is unmis- 
takably visible on the hill, and although about 
four miles distant* gives one a fair idea of its 
immense size. 

The descent into the town is quite two kilo- 
metres long, and is a fine bit of riding, when the 
roads are in good condition. On arriving at the 
Port we turn sharp to the left, which take^ us 
on to the sea-front, and another five minutes 
brings us to the Place Massena. 

There are four first-class restaurants in Nice, 
70 



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Lunch at the London House 

the London House and the Fran^ais being 
very good and decidedly expensive, whilst the 
Helder and the Regence are good and more 
reasonable in price. 

Having still the greatest confidence in our 
system, we decide to try the London House, 
and a very excellent lunch they gave us. This 
establishment is quite on a par with Ciro's at 
Monte Carlo, and the charges are relatively 
about the same. 
,» There is a very good bicycle shop almost 

s opposite the Restaurant, where they are only 

I too pleased to take charge of your machines, 

J and give them a dusting over during lunch. 

f The London House is always filled with the 

I monde chic at luncheon time, but the clientele 

is decidedly more cosmopolitan than at Ciro's, 
where about seventy-five per cent, of the people 
are usually English. Here, we have a strong 
Parisian element, mixed with Italians, Austrians, 
Russians, and a fair number of Americans. 
After coffee and cigars, we take a short stroll 
on the Promenade des Anglais, and then make 
a start for home. 

Passing the 'Port,' we notice a goodly array 
of steam-yachts moored alongside the quai, the 
most noticeable being Mr. Vanderbilt's Valiant 
— probably the largest private yacht in the 
world — and Mr. Higgins's beautiful Varuna, both 
7i 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

of course flying the Stars and Stripes. The 
Mont Boron Hill is quite rideable, but is tiring, 
owing to its great length, and we recommend 
most riders to walk a portion of it. 

On reaching the summit, after about two 
kilometres on the flat, the road bends round to 
the left, and we get a very fine view of Ville- 
franche harbour, picturesquely situated as it is 
in a sort of natural amphitheatre. Should you 
have the good luck to see it when the Queen is 
at Cimiez, and there are two or three English 
men-of-war lying at anchor, alongside the French 
Mediterranean Squadron of about fifteen enor- 
mous vessels, with perhaps two or three large 
private steam-yachts besides, you will probably 
agree with me, that it is a magnificent spectacle. 
After passing the Place d'Armes, there is 
rather a stiff hill, which had better be walked, 
and then we have a clear run to the station of 
Eze. Between Beaulieu and Eze, on emerging 
from a tunnel, where the road curves round to 
the left, there is a splendid view of the village of 
Eze, but the outer walls of it are built so much in 
configuration with the mountains around, that if 
you did not know where to look for the village, 
you would hardly notice its existence. 

After passing the station at Eze we have 
another longish hill to be surmounted before we 
reach the tunnels at La Turbie, and then it is 
72 



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Third Day's Play 



all plain sailing into Monaco. The view, half 
way down the hill, which we admired so much 
in the morning, is now even more beautiful in 
the rays of the setting sun. The ride back from 
Nice to Monte Carlo takes rather longer than it 
does to go, as the steep hills are against one 
most of the way. If the rider should be tired, 
he can always take the train at Beaulieu, and 
thereby avoid two of the stiffest ascents. 

Having shaken off the dust of the road, and 
changed our clothes, we sallied forth to the 
Casino, and took our seats at the usual table 
about half-past five. The numbers came out as 
follows : 

THIRD DAY'S PLAY. 



Black. Red. 



Score. 



" 8 
4 

33 


16 
3 


| No stake. 
No stake. 
Stake I Lose 
I Win 




o 
i W 




+ i 


20 




i W 


8 
3i 




I L 
I W 


13 


o 
I W 




+ i 


29 




I w 



Zero Fund. 
Nil 



Summary. 

Coups played . 

Won . . . 

Lost . . . 
Units won . . 



8 
6 

2 
4 



4 units @ fcs. loo = fcs. 400 
Add Zero Fund ,, o 

Total won 400 



[73] 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

It will be seen that we are in great luck to-night, 
and just happening to come in for an intermit- 
tence of four, followed by an unfinished sequence 
of five Blacks, we are able to retire with 400 
francs, after a stance of exactly twelve minutes. 
We consequently decided to dine early, at the 
table (ThSte at the Metropole, and go to the 
concert, as the programme for that evening 
seemed to be particularly attractive. There are 
free concerts at the Casino twice a-day, except 
when the Operas are being performed, viz. from 
about January 1 till the end of March, when 
there are only about five free concerts per week. 
Besides these there is a very fine classical concert 
every Thursday afternoon, when they make a 
small charge for seats. 

The Monte Carlo Orchestra is one of the most 
famous in the world. From November to May 
it consists of eighty permanent musicians, of 
whom about thirty-five are competent soloists. 
In the summer months the strength is reduced 
to about fifty, but the men who leave in May all 
return in November, after doing a short season 
with another orchestra, either at Aix-les-Bains 
or Biarritz. The result is, that this large body 
of picked musicians, having played together for 
years under the same leadership, have attained 
a very high standard of perfection. 

In Monsieur L£on Jehin, they have got a very 
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The Monte Carlo Orchestra 

able conductor, who has done much to raise the 
level of the concerts during the last few years. 
It is quite a treat to see him conduct ; he seems 
to know every note of the music, without refer- 
ring to the score, and to throw his whole soul 
into the execution of it Even if one were deaf 
it would be a pleasure to see him conducting a 
piece like the overture to ' Tannhauser? The 
following was the programme for the evening : 



75 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 



CERCLE DES ETRANGERS DE MONACO 



CONCERT 

Sous la direction de M. L&m JEHIN 
MM. GaeUn BORGHINI et Louis VIALET Sous-Chefs 



SOLOISTES DE L'ORCHESTRE 

M 1 * Thevenet et M. Roos, harpistes— MM. Corsanego, 
Comte et Bourdarot, violons— Nachtergaele et 
Zavattaro, altos— Carlo Sansoni et Terzolo, violon- 
celles— Franchi, contrebasse— Gabus, Chavanis et 
Bergin, flutes— Dorel, Lavagne et Sianesi, hautbois 
— Prouven, Caubere et Sainte-Marie, darinettes— 
Seigle et Espaignet, bassons— Bricoux, Lhoest et 
Bontoux, cors— Chavanne, Delsa et Duclaud pis- 
tons— Van Eessen, Rikir et De Camillis, trombones 
— Ase, bombardino. 



A 8 heures et demie du Soir 



Zampa, ouverture . 
Pizzicati . 

Fantasie sur La Favorita 
Valse de Concert . 



Overture de Tannhauser . 
Berceuse de Jocelyn 

(Solo de Violon par M. Corsanego) 
Dernier sommeil de la Vierge . 
Amoretten-Tanze, valse . 

76 



Herold 
Gillet 
Donizetti 
Godard 

Wagner 
Godard 

Massenet 
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The Monte Carlo Orchestra 

The accuracy and precision of the strings in 
the ' Pizzicati ' was something marvellous. In 
'La Favorita' the brass was heard to great 
advantage, while the execution of the lovely 
overture to ' Tannhduser' was simply perfect. 

Monsieur Corsanego, the first violin, is a great 
acquisition to # the band ; he is a very effective 
soloist, with perfect tone and fine execution. 
He is, moreover, the fortunate possessor of a 
valuable Straduarius, reported to be the gift of a 
rich lady admirer. In the lovely ' Berceuse de 
Jocelyn ' he was quite at his best, and of course 
scored a rapturous encore. 

After the concert, we took a turn round the 
Rooms, to inspect the new arrivals, and wound 
up the evening with a whisky-and-soda at the 
American Bar of the Cafe de Paris. 



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CHAPTER VII 

Third Ride— La Turbie— The Monastery of Laghet— 1 Ex 
Votos ' — The Gold-embroidered SHppers of the Com- 

tesse de B .—Laghet to Nice— St. Jean— Cap St. 

Hospice— Fourth Day's Play— A Triumph for the 
System. 

The rides and drives starting from Monte Carlo 
are naturally very limited in number, as the 
place itself is situated, as it were, on a shelf, and 
there is only the road into Italy to the east and 
the road to Nice on the west It is not advis- 
able for the cyclist to go into Italy, for two 
reasons : in the first place, even though you 
may be a member of the Touring Club de 
France, they give you no end of trouble at the 
Custom-house on the frontier; and .in the 
second place the roads are very inferior. 

We decided, therefore, to confine ourselves 
to French territory, and by making constant use 
of the little railway to La Turbie, and occasion- 
ally using the P. L. M., we found that we could 
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The Augustan Trophy 



^explore a new bit of country every day, and could 
doubtless have continued to do so for nearly a 
month. 

To-day, we again have recourse to the little 
1 Cr&naillfere,' and going up by the 9.30 a.m. 
train, reach La Turbie before ten. 

This time, we take a stroll through the old 
part of the village, and inspect the remains of 
the Roman Monument. If history is to be 
believed, this tower must originally have been 
something gigantic. It was built by Augustus 
Caesar in the year a.d. 8, to commemorate a 
crushing defeat he had just inflicted on the 
surrounding tribes. A portion of it was de- 
stroyed by the Moors in the sixth century, and 
finally the Duke of Berwick caused the monu- 
ment to be undermined, and blown up, in the 
year 1705. Why he should have committed 
this act of Vandalism I have been unable to 
ascertain. It is said, that from the ruins of the 
Augustan Trophy, not only the church and 
almost the entire village of La Turbie have been 
constructed, but a considerable quantity of the 
stone has also been taken down and used for 
building purposes in Monaco itself; and yet 
( there is still enough of it left standing to make a 

/ very imposing ruin! At any rate, Tennyson 

seems to have been sufficiently impressed by it, 



to write the lines — 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

" What Roman strength Turbia showed 
In ruin, by the mountain road." 

The church, and the old portion of Turbia, are 
doubtless worth exploring from an antiquarian 
and artistic point of view, and it is certainly 
cleaner than most places of its kind. 

We leave La Turbie by the same road as that 
described on page 55, but near the bottom of 
the hill, about a quarter of a mile outside the 
village, we find a road branching off to the right, 
marked : 

"Sanctuaire de Laghet, 2 kil." 

Taking this road, which should be carefully 
ridden, as the gradient is steep, and the turns 
very sharp in places, we soon arrive at the 
Monastery. 

Most picturesquely situated at the head of 
a pretty little valley running due west to the 
Paillon, and entirely sheltered by mountains to 
the north and east, this fine building looks more 
like an old chiteau than a monastery. Its his- 
tory is as follows : the votary chapel and con- 
vent were built by the Carmelites in the seven- 
teenth century. In 1704 it was deprived of its 
wealth — accumulated during sixty years — by the 
Princes of Savoy, who, being in financial straits, 
owing to war, were compelled to raise funds 
from the offerings brought by the faithful. In 
80 



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Monastery of Laghet 



1792, the French converted the convent into a 
hospital ; but in 181 5, when Piedmont resumed 
possession of its ancient territory, the Carmelites 
were re-installed at Laghet. Finally, in 1864, 
they bought the freehold from the French 
Government, as it had then become part of the 
new French Department of the Alpes-Maritimes. 
On Palm Sunday, Trinity Sunday, or Whit 
Sunday, crowds of devotees, and pilgrims from all 
parts of the country, flock to the place, and the 
little courtyard of the monastery presents a most 
/ animated scene. Booths and stalls are erected 

/ for the sale of sweets, toys, relics, etc., and a 

lively trade is carried on. 
\ In the interior of the building they have a 

most remarkable collection of votive offerings, 
j or ex votos as they are called, principally con- 

(, sisting of pictures. These depict the most mira- 

' culous escapes from accidents, disasters, and 

afflictions of every kind. We see men falling 
', off scaffoldings, children being run over, ship- 

j wrecks, surgical operations, and such like, all 

[ the victims being presumably either saved, or 

relieved, by the miraculous intervention of the 
t patron saint As the people in these illustra- 

< tions, and more especially the animals, all bear 

j a strong family likeness to one another, I pre- 

I sume they keep an artist on the premises who 

I will turn you out an ex voto at so much a square 

t 81 G 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

foot If this be so, he assuredly belongs to the 
ultra-realistic school ! 

But what attracted my attention more than 
all these works of art, was a dainty little pair of 
gold-embroidered slippers. They looked so 
strangely out of place, hanging over one of the 
doors close to the chapel, amongst an extra- 
ordinary collection of discarded crutches, sur- 
gical bandages, etc, etc. My curiosity was so 
aroused, that having approached one of the 
monks, I bought some relics from him, and over 
a glass of the rather nasty liqueur that is brewed 
on the premises, lured him on to tell me the 
history of the slippers. He proved equal to the 
occasion, and diving through one of the doors, 
he shortly re-appeared with a copy of the Jngaro 
about four months old. In it was a story about 
three columns long, written in beautiful French, 
all about my little slippers. As I have never 
met any one yet who knew the story, I venture 
to reproduce it here. 

About thirty years ago Comte de B , a 

young man of good family, but impoverished 
through extravagance, was fortunate enough to 

win the affections of Mademoiselle P , a 

beautiful Mentonese orphan, who, on coming of 
age, was entitled to a large fortune. They 
were duly married, but unfortunately it did 
not take the young girl very long to discover 
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A Romantic 'ex voto' 



that the Count was not really in love with her, 
and had only married her for her money. He 
was a confirmed gambler, and used to spend 
all his time at the Monte Carlo tables, leaving 
her alone all day at Mentone. When he did 
return, late at night, he was generally in the 
worst of tempers, and the result was, that 
for four months they led a most miserable 
existence. 

Being utterly wretched, the young Countess 
resolved to run away. one day, whilst her 
/ husband was at Monte Carlo, to try if religion 

* would bring any consolation. She accordingly 
j disappeared one morning, and no one knew 

what had become of her. She had in reality 
gone to Laghet, and taken rooms at the inn 
[ there under an assumed name, and there she 

remained hidden for over three months, spend- 
ing most of her time in prayers and devotions. 
One day, the Count, having had terribly bad 
< luck at the tables before lunch, resolved to go 

/ for a walk in the afternoon to cool his heated 

{ brain. He was now quite at the end of his 

, resources, and was wondering what on earth he 

i should do if he could not find his wife and win 

her over again. 
( He climbed the hill to La Turbie, and 

/ wandered aimlessly on to Laghet, and was sit- 

ting at a table outside the little inn drinking an 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

absinthe, when all of a sudden a terrific storm 
commenced. It thundered and lightened and 
poured in torrents. After it had continued for 
over two hours without showing any signs of 
abating, the Count began to wonder what he 
should do. It was beginning to get dark, and 
here he was without a coat or even an umbrella, 
and there was not a carriage to be had within 
twelve miles. 

There was no help for it, he would have to 
pass the night there. So he sent for the good 
woman who kept the inn and asked if they could 
put him up for the night. " Certainly, they had 
a bedroom which was at his disposal, but they 
were sorry there was no place where he could 
dine in comfort, as the only sitting-room in the 
house had been occupied by a lady for the last 
three months, and he would therefore have to 
dine in the kitchen or in his bedroom ; unless, 
that is to -say, Madame would permit him to 
dine with her in the parlour. If Monsieur would 
be so good as to give them his card, they would 
explain the situation to Madame, and see what 
could be done." 

So his card was duly taken to the Countess, 
and the circumstances explained, and although 
the situation was decidedly embarrassing, there 
was no way out of it : she was occupying the 
room which was in reality the public dining- 
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A Romantic 'ex voto' 



room, so she could not well refuse, especially 
as the Monsieur was described as being very 
nice-looking, ' avec un air trfes distingu^ ! ' 

When the Count entered the room, and found 
that the lady who so kindly allowed him to dine 
in her sitting-room was in reality his own wife, 
his astonishment can be better imagined than 
described ! She received him very coldly, and 
kept him quite at a distance during the whole 
of dinner, but as the night was intensely cold, 
and there was no other fire in the house, she 
I could not well refuse to allow him to remain in 

'] the room until it was time to retire to bed. The 

I Countess drew up her arm-chair to the fire, and 

the Count thought he had never seen his wife 
\ look so perfectly charming as she did that night, 

I dressed in a most becoming peignoir, with the 

!> tiny gold-embroidered slippers on her dainty 

j little feet. 

; For the first time in his life he fell genuinely 

{ in love with her, and throwing himself on his 

knees at her feet he implored her forgiveness. 
I " If she would only come back to him, he would 

<• promise to give up gambling for ever. They 

[ would sell the house at Mentone and go to 

i Paris, where he would rind some occupation, and 

; be out of the way of temptation." 

; Seeing that he was really in earnest, she of 

) course forgave him, and they became reconciled 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

on the spot. Two years afterwards, having lived 
happily ever since, and being now the mother 
of a little boy, born on the anniversary of their 
reconciliation, the Countess again visited Laghet, 
and in addition to a handsome donation to the 
funds of the Monastery, she left the gold-em- 
broidered slippers as an ex voto. Such was the 
story as it appeared in the Figaro^ and un- 
commonly well it was written. 

But to get to Nice in time for lunch we must 
be going on, so we leave the courtyard of the 
Monastery, and, instead of crossing the bridge, 
turn down sharp to the left and double back 
under it. This is a rough and stony path for 
about a quarter of a mile, but if you do not care 
to wheel the machines yourself, you will find 
plenty of boys waiting on the bridge, who for 
ten sous will gladly undertake the job. After 
crossing a small stream, we find ourselves once 
more on a very good road, which descends with 
a gentle gradient all the way to the village of 
Trinity Victor. This is situated on the bank 
of the Paillon about seven kilometres from 
Laghet, and on turning to the left, about another 
eight kilometres will bring us into Nice. The 
principal objects to be noticed on the way down 
are the Observatory perched high up on the hill 
to our left, above the Corniche Road, whilst on 
our right we pass a large lunatic asylum, and 
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Cap St. Hospice 



lower down the Monastery of St. Pons. The 
Monastery of Cimiez is also visible on the high 
ground to our right. 

We ride straight on into the town of Nice, 
and crossing the river make for the Cate de la 
Regence, which is situated at the corner of the 
Avenue de la Gare, and the Rue Hotel de la 
Poste. 

Here they provide you with a very good lunch, 
and the prices show a great reduction on those 
of the London House,, but you will not find 
the company nearly so entertaining as at the 
latter restaurant. 

After lunch, instead of riding straight back to 
Monte Carlo, as described in the preceding 
chapter, we take the road as far as Villefranche, 
and at the bottom of the hill after leaving the 
town, about two kilometres from Villefranche 
and eight and a half from Nice, we turn off to 
the right across a bridge over the railway. This 
brings us right in front of Mr. McCalmont's 
villa, where we turn to the left, and continuing 
to bear away to the left, eventually arrive at the 
charmingly situated little fishing village of St. 
Jean. 

Riding through the village, we continue on to 

a little promontory that runs right out to sea, 

commonly known as Cap St. Hospice. At the 

extreme point is a pretty little church and a 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

Martello Tower. It was in this little churchyard 
that the body of Paganini, the famous violinist, 
was first interred, but it was subsequently stolen 
from here by the Italians during the night. 

From the Martello Tower there is a wonderful 
view of the coast-line to the east. From here 
to the point of Monaco is a magnificent semi- 
circular bay, surrounded by rugged mountains. 
The little village of Eze is in the centre perched 
up on high, whilst away to the east are Cap 
Martin, Vintimille, and Bordighera, in the far 
distance. 

Retracing our steps we ride back to the village 
of St. Jean, where there are two restaurants, 
the Hotel Namouna and the Restaurant de 
la Bouillabaisse, kepfr by one Marc Antoine. 
Both these hostelries are famous for * Bouilla- 
baisse,' the well-known Provencale delicacy, 
made, of rock-fish and small langoustes, and 
flavoured with garlic. It is a most excellent 
dish for lunch. 

From here to the Hotel Bristol at Beaulieu, 
there is only a narrow path running along the 
sea-shore ; this is quite rideable, with care, but 
should hardly be undertaken by a beginner. At 
Beaulieu we take the train for Monte Carlo, 
having ridden altogether about 35 kilometres. 

At six o'clock we took our seats at the Casino 
at the usual table, and on this occasion we had 



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Fourth Day's Play 



an experience that fully demonstrated the 

strength of our system. Details of the play are 

appended : 

FOURTH DAY'S PLAY. 



Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


29 
6 


36 
12 

14 
25 

30 


No Stake 
No Stake 
St. 1 L 
1 L 


33 

j- ' 

8 
6 

17 
29 


32 
12 

14 

5 
3 
1 


- 7 
1 W 


- 6 
1 L 




- 2 
1 W 


31 


- 7 




- I 
iL 


1 L 




-8 • 




- 2 
1 W 


1 L 


24 


- 9 
iL 


10 


- 1 

1 L 








- 2 
iL 


-10 
St. 2 W 








-?L 


- 8 

2L 


13 


- 4 
iL 


-10 

2W 


28 


■II 


- 8 

2L 




- 6 
iL 


-10 

2L 


6 


- 7 
1 W 


-12 
2L 


15 


- 6 
1 L 


-14 
2W 




- 7 


- 12 



l*?J 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 



Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


| Black. 


Red. 


Score. 




21 

I 
16 
27 

25 ■ 


-12 
2W 


! 
1 

z 
28 

2 

17 
33 

4 
24 
29 

22 

13 


19 
18 

18 
30 


-12 
2L 


6 


-IO 
2L 


-14 
2L 


2 


- 12 
2L 


-I6 

2L 


13 


-14 
2W 


-18 

2L 


29 


- 12 
2 W 


-20 

2L 




2L 


-22 
2L 




- 12 
2L 


-24 
2 W 




-14 
2 W 


-22 

2L 


6 


-12 
2L 


-24 
2L 


2 


-14 
2L 


-26 
2L 




-I6 
2 W 


-28 
2L 


4 


-14 
2 W 


-SO 

St. 3W 


11 


-12 
2L 


-27 
3W 


10 


-14 
2W 


-24 
3W 




-12 ' 


-21 



[90] 



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Fourth 


Day' 


s Play 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


24 


16 

12 

36 
16 

27 
18 

z. 

1 


-21 
3W 


II 
8 


14 
30 
14 

5 

3 

9 

3 

36 

25 
34 
14 
21 


-18 
3 W 


6 


-l8 
3W 


-{l 




"It 


-18 

3L 


2 


-18 
3 W 


-21 
3W 


13 


~ l h 


-18 
3L 




-l8 

3L 


-21 
3W 




-21 
3L 


-18 
3L 




-24 

3W 


-21 
3W 


II 


-21 

3L 


-18 
3W 




3W 


-»5 

3 W 


24 


-21 
3 W 


-12 
3W 




-18 
3W 


- 9 
3W 


28 


3W 


- 6 

3W 




-12 
3L 


2 


"iw 




-15 

3L 









-18 





[91] 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 



Zero Fund. Summary. 

Fes. ioo on 35th coup Coups played . . 82 

„ 100 „ 42nd „ Won .... 36 

„ 100 „ 44th „ Lost .... 46 

150,, 68th ,, Units won . . . o 



Fes. 450 



Add Zero Fund, fcs. 450 



The table runs very badly for us at the com- 
mencement, and it will be seen that at the 
19th 'coup' we have to increase our unit to 2. 

Our bad luck still continues, and at the 51st 
'coup* being — 30, we increase the unit to 3. 
Meanwhile ' zero ' has come up three times, and 
as we were playing stakes of 200 francs at the 
time, we have been able to take off 300 francs, 
and place them to 'Zero Fund.' 

Our luck then commences to improve, till 
eventually, with a run of '9 reds, we are able 
to bring the score to O. Having by this time 
450 francs to the credit of 'Zero Fund,' we can 
now retire with that amount in hand. 

It will be seen, that although we have won 
more than our prescribed amount, the Bank has 
won 25 per cent, more bets than ourselves on 
that day's play. • 

Once more our system had triumphed I 



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CHAPTER VIII 

Fourth Ride— Railway of the Sud de la France— Nice— 
Colomars— Tourettes — Vence — Cagnes — Fifth Bay's 
Play— French ' as she is spoke* at the Tables- 
Restaurant of the H6tel de Paris — Monsieur Fleury. 

I To-day, we explore an entirely new country to 

( the north-west of Nice. In addition to the 

river Paillon, which comes down from the 
i mountains, and runs right through the centre of 

the town, there is another and still larger river, 
i Le Var, which flows into the sea, about four 

miles to the west of Nice. There is an excel- 
1 lent road alongside the river, with hardly a hill 

worth mentioning, for at least forty miles, and as 
) there is a most convenient little railway, which 

f also follows the river as far as Puget-Th^niers, 

( 65 kilometres from Nice, the cyclist will be 

! hard to please if he cannot arrange a ride to 

\ suit his taste. 

) This wonderful little railway, called the Sud 

/ de la France, starts from Nice to the north of 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

the P. L. M., and runs right up into the heart 
of the mountains, and by its aid one is enabled 
to enjoy magnificent scenery, and arrive at the 
most interesting little villages, which would 
otherwise be inaccessible to the majority of 
cyclists. At a place called Colomars, about 17 
kilometres by road from Nice, this railway 
divides; one line continuing up the valley of 
the Var to Puget-Thdniers, and the other 
crossing the river and going to Grasse and 
Draguignan. We intend to ride from Nice to 
Colomars, which is on the flat, and then take the 
latter line, after lunch, to a station called Tour- 
ettes, from whence we have a splendid run back 
into Nice. 

We left Monte Carlo by the 9.40 a.m. train, 
and arrived at Nice soon after ten. On leaving 
the station you turn to the right, and then 
take the first to the left, viz. the Boulevard 
Gambetta, which brings you down on to the 
Promenade des Anglais. Here of course you 
turn to the right, and continue straight ahead, 
till you come to a railway-bridge close to the 
station of Le Var. Here the road divides, but 
we have to continue straight on under the 
bridge, and along the left bank of the river, till 
we come to the Colomars station, about 17 
kilometres from Nice. 

Just outside Colomars station there is a very 
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Colomars 

good little cafi restaurant, kept by the repre- 
sentative of the Touring Club de France, and 
here they give you as good a lunch as any 
one requires, with wine ad lib. and coffee and 
liqueurs, for about 3.50 francs a head. From the 
road at Colomars there is a really magnificent 
view. The swiftly-running river is at our feet, 
the mountains surrounding it are studded with 
the most picturesque little villages, and far away 
to the north is a range of snow peaks. Just 
across the river to the west is the majestic 
Crag of St Jeannet, with' the quaint little village 
of that name nestling beneath it. This curiously- 
shaped mass of rock forms a well-known land- 
mark, which can be seen for many miles in either 
direction. Looking up the valley, the little vil- 
lage of Gattiferes is perched up high on our left, 
Carros is in front, with Castagniers and Asprd- 
mont on the right 

Our train, which leaves at 12.35 p.m., crosses 
the river, and immediately makes a very stiff 
ascent to Gattiferes ; we then pass close under 
St Jeannet, run through Vence, and arrive at 
Tourettes at 1.42 p.m. This is a most curious 
old place, about n 00 feet above the sea, and 
although it has a railway-station, and is within 
sixteen miles of Nice, it looks as if it had re- 
mained in much the same condition for the last 
thousand years or so. We take a stroll through 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

the village, and then mount our machines and 
ride to Vence, about five kilometres distant, on 
the road to Nice. 

Vence is a place of some importance, having 
considerably over 3000 inhabitants. It is the 
seat of a Bishop, and can therefore boast of a 
cathedral, which dates back to the fifteenth 
century. From an architectural and antiquarian 
point of view, I should think there are few more 
interesting places than this in the whole 
neighbourhood. 

From Vence, down on to the high road run- 
ning from Cannes to Nice, is a splendid run of 
about nine kilometres, with a descent of nearly 
1000 feet; the road is wide, with a fine sur- 
face, and is nowhere sufficiently steep to be 
dangerous. After descending for about four and 
a half kilometres, we pass the ancient town of 
Saint Paul, which stands on a hill away to our 
right. The road now descends through pine 
woods, until about three kilometres further on 
we have a fine view of the old town of Cagnes, 
situated on an eminence to our left, with its 
grand old Grimaldi Castle in the centre. We 
enter the modern part of the town, and turn to 
the left, where we find ourselves on the Route 
Nationale, which brings us to Nice after another 
twelve kilometres on the flat There is nothing 
of much interest to be noticed on the way from 
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Fifth Day's Play 



Cagnes to Nice with the exception of the view 

from the bridge crossing the Var. Shortly after 

passing the bridge the race-course may be seen 

on the right-hand side of the road. On arriving 

at Nice we have some tea, and then take the 

train to Monte Carlo. We have ridden to-day 

about 43 kilometres. 

We went over to the Casino at about six 

I o'clock, and found that we had a very easy day's 

work before us. The table ran as appears on 

page 98. 

, Zero comes up the very, first spin, and is fol- 

I lowed by two more losses. We then find that 

j we are on a run of six Blacks, and are therefore 

j enabled to win our first unit. The table then 

gives us five Reds, which enables us to win 

■ another unit, and as we now come in for an 

t unfinished run of four intermittences, we are 

I able to retire on the 16th 'coup ' with 450 francs. 

The stance only lasted twenty-five minutes. 
I We were very much amused at the behaviour 

; of a most excitable Englishwoman, who was 

;,'' playing at our table. She knew about as much 

I French as the ordinary school-boy of ten, and 

', her pronunciation of what little she did know 

was so extraordinary that she would probably 
/ have been better understood had she stuck to 

her native tongue. It is usual when one wishes 
( to change gold into five-franc pieces to pass the 

> 97 H 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

FIFTH DAY'S PLAY. 



Black. 


Red. 


Score. | 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 




3 
23 

T 


No Suke 1 
No Stake 1 

St. 1 L 
iL 




3 l 
18 

3 
14 
36 


iL 
1 L 


2 
29 


-2 
1 W 


3i 


-2 

1 L 


-1 
1 w 


10 


-3 
1 W 



1 W 




-2 1 

1 W j 


+ 1 


17 


29 


34 


1 L 
1 W 


26 


- 1 ! 
1 w ; 







! 

1 w 


1 W 


10 


+ 1 




+ 1 ll 


12 


+ iW 



Zero Fund. 
Fes. 50 on 1st coup. 



Summary. 

Coups played . . . 

Won ...".. 

Lost 

Units won . . . 



16 

10 
6 

4 



4 units @ fcs. 100 ss fcs. 400 

Add Zero Fund ... 50 

Total won . . 450 



croupier a louis, and ask for 'quatre pieces.' 
Instead of this she kept passing up louis from 
the end of the table, and asking in a loud voice 
for 'quatre morceaux, s'il vous. plait.' She ap- 
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French 'as she is spoke* 

peared quite unconscious that every one at the 
table was laughing at her; and, on one occasion, 
having given the croupier a piece to put on 8, 
which she thought he had wrongly placed, she 
shrieked out, as the ball was spinning, "Croupier ! 
croupier ! je vous away dee de mettay le morceau 
sur le 'wheat,' mais vous l'away mettay sur le 
'ongs'!" Unfortunately for her the 'wheat* 
did not come up. 

Curious mistakes often occur through the 
extraordinary pronunciation of French by the 
English people in 'the Rooms.' On one occa- 
sion a friend of Frank's who wished to change 
a thousand-franc note into hundred-franc pieces, 
had b$en told to ask for 'plaques.' He accord- 
ingly went up to one of the croupiers, handed 
him the note, and said, " Plaques, s'il vous plait." 
There was rather a crowd at the tables, so he 
did not notice what the man was doing, and was 
very much astonished when, after some delay, 
he was handed back two thousand francs ! The 
croupier, thinking our friend was talking Eng- 
lish, had put the note on to Black, which, fortun- 
ately for him, turned up, otherwise there would 
have been no end of a fuss. 

This reminds me of another amusing incident 
/ that occurred last year at Monte Carlo. 

\ . Lord Salisbury was ill with influenza, and a 

j most alarming telegram had been posted up in 

j . 



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A 



Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

the Hall of the Casino in the morning, to the 
effect that his lordship was very much worse, 
and would probably have to resign office. About 

five o'clock in the evening B , one of the 

biggest gossips and busybodies in the place, 
rushed into the hall of the M&ropole, where 
about fifty people were having tea, and shouted 
out, " Have you heard the news ? Lord Salis- 
bury has gone mad ! " 

Of course there was tremendous excitement ; 
people rushed up-stairs to tell their friends and 
relations, and the news spread like wildfire. 

" How did you hear it ? " I inquired rather 
sceptically. " Oh, there can be no doubt about 
it," he said ; " I saw the telegram myself M the 
Rooms. It has just been posted up." Rather 

doubting B *s ability to translate a French 

telegram correctly, I thought I would stroll 
across and see what it said. The message was : 
"La dernifere nouvelle de Lord Salisbury est 
d^mentie." This he had construed into "the 
latest news is that Lord Salisbury is demented !" 

As the system was going so successfully, and 
we were living well within our means, we de- 
cided to indulge to-night in an expensive dinner 
at the restaurant of the Hotel de Paris, which 
every one informed us was ' one of the sights 
of the place/ 

Although Ciro's is 'the very best* place for 

IQO 



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Dinner At 'The Paris 4 



lunch in Monte Carlo, it is by no means the 
most amusing restaurant for dinner. It is per- 
haps the most comfortable place to dine at, as 
the service is always good, and there is no 
crowd, but many people would consider it too 
quiet. Undoubtedly the finest, largest, and 
most amusing place for dinner is the restaurant 
of the Hotel de Paris. It is the most beautiful 
room in Monte Carlo, and every night, probably 
from February i till April 15, they serve at least 
seven or eight hundred dinners. The cellar is 
certainly the best in the place, and would prob- 

, ably compare favourably with any establishment 

1 of its size in the world. 

•' The general excellence of the restaurant is 

undoubtedly entirely due to the energy and 

; great ability of Monsieur Fleury, the manager. 

I If Ciro can be compared to a brigadier, Fleury 

should take rank as general of a division, for he 

', has at least four times the staff to control, and 

four times the number of clients to serve, and 
yet he contrives to please them all. He has the 
best of good manners, a most amiable disposi- 

| tion, and plenty of tact They say he draws 

j the largest salary of any hotel manager in the 

> world, and as he has probably more than doubled 

• the receipts of the Paris during the last three 

I years, he no doubt deserves it. 

/ What an extraordinary collection of human 

{ 101 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

beings you find assembled here at about half- 
past eight o'clock ! Princes, Grand-Dukes, aris- 
tocrats of every nationality, diplomates, financiers, 
politicians, actors, and even jockeys, are all 
busily engaged in discussing the good things 
which ' le Bon Dieu,' through the medium of 
Mons. Fleury, has been pleased to provide. 
And the ladies ; well, this is the place, to see 
them in all their glory ! Some,, no doubt, take 
an interest in the good things also, but what the 
majority are chiefly engaged upon, is in display- 
ing the smartest frocks and the latest hats, 
provided by their long-suffering husbands — or 
somebody else's husbands — through the obliging 
medium of Messrs. Doucet and Worth; and 
likewise in criticizing those of their neighbours I 

The actresses and demi-monde here reign 
supreme, and are arrayed in all their war-paint. 
You will see Liane de Pougy, La Belle Otero, 
and the beautiful Madame Martial, covered with 
jewels : Fanny Ward, Mathilde Damuseau, arid 
the charming Madame ' Lula ' always dressed to 
perfection ; and if you are lucky, you may per- 
haps catch a glimpse of the famous Princesse de 
Chimay. 

We gave Mons. Fleury carte blanche to order 
us a nice little dinner, only stipulating that it 
should not be too long. The following is what 
he gave us : 



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Monsieur Fleury 



Hors d'CEuvres. 

Consomme* a la Reinc. 

Filets de Merlan Bercy. 

Scllc d'Agneau Renaissance. 

Becasse Rdti. 

Salade. 

Souffle Surprise. 

Vins. 



Moet and Chandon, Dry Imperial, 1889. 

Cuvee, 36. 

Fine Champagne, 1809. 

Grande Reserve. 

The fish a la Bercy is one of the specialities 
of this restaurant, and is equally good with sole, 
merlan, or mostele. It is a most delicious sauce, 
flavoured with the little native onions, called 
cchalotts. The souffle surprise is also a speciality 
of the Paris. The souffle comes up steaming 
hot, and with all the appearance of an ordinary 
soufftt, but when you come to help yourself, you 
, find that the centre consists of delicious straw- 

( berry or raspberry ice ! How on earth they 

( manage to serve it without the ice melting, is a 

I culinary mystery that I am unable to solve. 

\ Fleury is a great connoisseur of wine, and 

prides himself very much on the old brandy at 
the Paris. We asked for a couple of glasses 
of the very best in the house, and found it very 
much to be recommended. It is four francs a 
) glass, ninety francs a bottle, or ^30 a dozen ! 

/ ■ 103 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

If you go over the cellars, they will show you 
one huge cask of old brandy, which is said to 
be worth nearly 100,000 francs ! 

To give you an idea of the charges at the 
Paris, a copy of our bill is appended. 

H6tel de Paris, Monte Carlo. 

Ja. c. 

2 Couverts 1 

Hors d'GEuvres 1 50 

Consomme 2 50 

Merlan 5 

Selle d'Agneau 5 

Becasse, Salade . . . . 10 

Souffle 4 

Cafc 2 

1 Moet and Chandon, 1889, frappee . 19 

2 Fine Champagne, 1809 ... 8 

Total 58 00 



104 



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CHAPTER IX 

Fifth Ride — Grasse — Fragonard and his famous Panels— 
Magagnosc— Villeneuve-Loubet — Sixth Day's Play. 

The two finest rides within easy reach of Monte 
Carlo are undoubtedly from Grasse to Nice, and 
from Eritrevaux to Colomars. In both cases you 
take the train up into the mountains, and return 
on your 'bikes,' through a beautiful country, 
along a road with a perfect surface, and a slight 
gradient in the right direction, almost the entire 
distance. 

The most picturesque line to Grasse is of 
course the Sud de la France, vid Colomars, 
Tourettes, and the Gorges du Loup, but as the 
first train started from Nice too early for us, and 
as the second one gets to Grasse too late in the 
day, we decided lo go by the P. L. M. line vid 

' Cannes. 

• We particularly wished to get to Grasse in 

> good time, as we had, through the courtesy of 

f 105 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

Messrs. Smith and Co., the Bankers, obtained 
permission to view the famous pictures of 
Fragonard, in the old house of M. Malvilan. 
This, as it turned out, was a great piece of good 
luck, for the pictures, after having remained 
exactly as we saw them for just upon a hundred 
years, were sold three weeks after our visit, and 
we were consequently almost the last foreign 
visitors to view them. 

Most useful and ever - obliging people are 
Smith and Co. They will provide you with 
funds 'to break the Bank,' and remit your 
winnings home to England ; they will book you 
places in the train, and give you a ticket for 
almost any destination on the face of the globe; 
they are House Agents, Estate Agents, Insurance 
Agents, and Wine Merchants ; and in this par- 
ticular instance they seem to have acted most 
successfully as Agents for a dealer in works of 
Art. 

For the last twenty-five years the Art Dealers 
of the whole world have been trying to buy those 
famous pictures at Grasse without success ; and 
when, a few years ago, the somewhat eccentric 
ownershowed the door to an amateur, who brought 
800,000 francs with him and placed the notes 
on the table of his salon, it was generally sup- 
posed that money would not buy the Fragonards, 
at any rate during the lifetime of M. Malvilan. 
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► Fragonard's Pictures 

Messrs. Smith and Co., however, appear to have 
succeeded where so many had failed, and thanks 
to their intervention, the pictures are, at the time 
I write, safely removed and duly installed in 
London. 

Leaving Monte Carlo at 9.40 a.m., and chang- 
ing the train at Cannes, you arrive at Grasse in 
time for lunch. The best thing to do on arrival, 
is to put your ' bikes ' on to the Grand Hotel 'bus, 
and go up in it yourselves to the hotel. It is 
nearly two miles from the station to the Grand, 
with a very stiff ascent for most of the way, so it 
is certainly not advisable to attempt to ride it. 

Having lunched extremely well at this excel- 
lent hotel, from the terrace of which there is 
a truly delightful view, we proceeded on our 
machines to the house of M. Malvilan. The 
old gentleman himself was, I regret to say, 
indisposed, and unable to receive us,' but being 
accompanied by Messrs. Smith and Co.'s repre- 
sentative at Grasse, who had very kindly met us 
at the Grand Hotel, we were at once admitted 
and shown the pictures. 

It may here interest the reader to learn some- 
thing of Fragonard, and these five most famous 
paintings. 

Jean Honor^ Fragonard was born at Grasse 
in 1732, and began life seriously, at the age of 
fifteen, as a notary's clerk. As, however, he soon 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

found himself quite unfitted for the legal pro- 
fession, and had always shown much artistic 
talent, he was sent up to Paris with an introduc- 
tion to Boucher. 

The latter appears to have taken a great fancy 
at first sight to the fresh young Provengal boy, 
and a genuine and lasting affection sprung up 
between them. 'Frago* (as Boucher used to 
call him) proved himself such an apt pupil, that 
at the age of twenty he carried off. 'the grand 
prix de Rome ' with his 'Jeroboam sacrificing to 
Idols.' Inspired by his success, he determined 
to visit Italy, and study in the Italian Schools. 
Before leaving, Boucher warned him not to take 
the great Italian Masters too seriously, as he was 
convinced, at the time, that it was in the lighter 
style of painting that his pupil would excel; 
1 Frago ' was absent from Paris for about five 
years, and when he returned he attempted the 
treatment of more serious and ambitious subjects. 
As, however, he could find no sale for such 
works, he finally adopted his master's style, 
which was exactly suited to the taste of the 
period. 

On Boucher's death, in 1770, Fragonard 
became the most popular painter of the day, and 
being possessed of charming manners, and plenty 
of wit, he readily obtained the tntrke to the 
society of the Court For some years previous 
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Life of Fragonard 



to the Revolution he was making as much as 
sixty thousand francs a year by his brush. A 
great French critic has said : " Si Boucher &ait le 
peintre des nymphes, Fragonard aura €t€ celui 
de l'Amour et du Baiser." 

Shortly before her death Madame du Barry 
commissioned Fragonard to paint her four large 
panels for the decoration of the salon of her 
Chiteau de Louveciennes. The paintings were 
duly executed, and represented a love story : 
they were entitled, c La Rencontre/ ' La Declara- 
tion,' ' La Serenade,' and ' L'Escalade.' Then 
the King died, and Madame du Barry being 
unable to take delivery of the panels, they were 
consequently thrown upon the artist's hands. 
Fragonard made many attempts to sell them 
without success, and still possessed them when 
the Revolution broke out. 

He then went down to Grasse on a visit to his 
old -friend the Marquis de Blys. He told his 
friend about the panels, and the latter, in spite of 
the hardness of the times, was tempted to take 
them off the artist's hands at a nominal figure. 
Fragonard consequently went back to Paris and 
) brought down the panels to Grasse, and they 

\ were duly installed in the salon, where we had 

the good fortune to see them. 

As soon as they were set up, Fragonard 
noticed that a fifth panel was necessary to 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

complete the decoration of the room, and he 
accordingly set to work to paint another, which 
is called ' L'Abandon.' This, unfortunately, was 
still unfinished at the time of his death, or it 
would certainly have been the most beautiful of 
the series. 

It is reported that the price paid by the 
Marquis for the five great pictures was only 
fifteen hundred francs, but as both he himself 
and the artist were in great poverty at the time, 
owing to the Revolution, this was a matter of 
arrangement between them. 

With the commencement of the nineteenth 
century, pictures of the Boucher and Fragonard 
School went quite out of fashion, and there being 
no further demand for his works, poor ' Frago ' 
died in the year 1806 in abject poverty. Such 
is the irony of Fate ! 

The Marquis de Blys lived for a great many 
years after Fragonard's death, and though almost 
penniless, turned a deaf ear to all would-be 
purchasers of his magnificent chef tfceuvrts. 
He took a great pride in showing them to 
visitors, and it must have been a touching sight 
to see the broken-down old nobleman in this 
poor little house, ill clad, with a hat full of holes, 
living like a pauper rather than give ' up the 
paintings, which he considered as part of the 
family. He died, not so very long ago, at a 



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The Fragonard Paintings 

great age, urging his daughter, who had married 
M. Malvilan, to have "neither his pride nor his 
madness." But times improved, and the Malvi- 
lans, though never rich, became comfortably off. 
Madame Malvilan died leaving a daughter, who 
also died young, leaving two little girls ; and if 
M. Malvilan had not been advised that it would 
be in his grandchildren's interests to sell, he also 
would probably have died in possession of the 
pictures. "As it is, he reluctantly consented to 
sell them to. Mr. Charles Wertheimer, of Norfolk 
Street, London, for the sum of fifty thousand 
pounds, on condition that the purchaser allowed 
him eight months in which to have the panels 
copied. 

This has now been done, and the copies, 
which are a great success, may be seen in the 
salon which contained the originals. 

Of course the moment the sale became known, 
there was a great outcry in the French papers 
against ' Perfide Albion,' who was said to be 
robbing France of her choicest works of art. 
The Figaro alone took a broad view of the 
transaction. In a leading article it said that the 
sale was a subject for great congratulation for 
France, for it would undoubtedly enhance the 
value of French pictures in the markets of the 
world. Mr. Wertheimer, with his accustomed 
generosity, would be sure to lend his new 
in 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

treasures to one of those marvellous exhibitions 
that take place annually in London. Thousands 
of people would flock to see pictures which had 
such an interesting history, and for which such 
a fabulous price had been paid, and the public 
would thus have the opportunity of comparing 
the works of a French artist, comparatively un- 
known in England, with the Dutch, Italian, and 
English Schools of the same period. Such a 
comparison could not fail to be favourable to 
France. 

It is not difficult to discover that the principal 
industry of Grasse is the manufacture of per- 
fumery and scented soap. The whole town 
smells like the Strand outside RimmePs shop, 
and if one had the time to spare, a visit to one 
of the factories would doubtless be very interest- 
ing. I believe that about one-fifth of the scent 
used in the entire world now comes from the 
little town of Grasse ; in addition to which they 
export annually large quantities of preserved 
fruits and prussic acid, made from the kernels 
of the bitter almonds. A great number of the 
roses used for the manufacture of the famous 
Otto of Roses are cultivated on the slopes be- 
tween Grasse and Cannes. From the middle 
of April till May 15, this whole tract of country, 
of several square miles, resembles one enormous 
rose-bed. 

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Qrasse 

On leaving M. Malvilan's house, we again 
ride up past the Grand Hotel, and continue to 
ascend for about 4J kilometres to a village 
called Magagnosc. On our right about a mile 
from the Grand Hotel is a lovely Chateau with 
large private grounds, belonging to Baroness de 
Rothschild, who has lived at Grasse for a great 
number of years. Beyond it there is a fine 
view down the valley to the sea, with the 
Esterels closing in the view to the west. 

The ascent to Magagnosc is very gradual and 
easily ridden, as the surface of the road is per- 
fect. After passing through the village there 
are several cross-roads, and we must be careful 
to take the right one : fortunately there can be 
no mistake, as there is a sign-post with ' Route 
Nationale, No. 85 ' plainly marked on it. This 
is our best way to Nice, as we wish to get back 
to Monte Carlo in time for the business of the 
day. If one had another hour or so to spare, 
the most picturesque road is. the one branching 
off to the left, just outside Magagnosc, leading 
down through the 'Gorges du Loup* to Le 
Bar, and then ascending to the village of 
Tourettes, from whence the ride would be the 
same as described in the preceding chapter. 
The scenery the whole way is very fine, but 
there is a long hill of over five kilometres to be 
surmounted between Le Loup and Tourettes, 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

and it will take an ordinary rider about, an hour 
longer to reach Cagnes by this route. 

From Magagnosc to Villeneuve-Loubet is a 
gentle descent the whole way for about 17 J 
kilometres. There is safe 'coasting 1 for most 
of the distance, if your machine is provided 
with a good reliable brake. The views are 
somewhat restricted as the valley is a narrow 
one, and the road runs for part of the way 
through pine-woods. On arriving at Villeneuve- 
Loubet, we stop for a moment on the bridge to 
admire the fine modern Ch&teau, standing on 
a hill in the centre of the village. A short 
way below the bridge on the right bank of the 
river is an excellent country inn, where they 
will provide you with lunch or tea at very 
moderate rates. They are famous for their 
trout, caught in the Loup. This is a charming 
place for a picnic dinner from Nice in the 
month of May, as the woods all round the inn 
are full of nightingales. From Villeneuve to 
Cagnes is only about three kilometres, but there 
is one stiff hill to ascend, part of which had 
better be walked. From Cagnes to Nice is all 
plain sailing on the flat The whole distance 
from Grasse to Nice is about 36 kilometres, and 
will take an ordinary rider about two hours. 
As it was, we just caught the 5.25 p.m. train 
from Nice, which brought us to Monte Carlo 

IJ4 



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£ixth Day's May 



before six. We were in our seats at the table 
by 6.40, which is perhaps the very best time of 
the whole day for playing a system. There are 
so few people gambling then, that you will often 
see over fifty spins in the hour as compared 
with about thirty at half-past four in the after- 
noon or ten o'clock at night. The numbers 
came out as follows : 

SIXTH DAY'S PLAY. 



Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


35. 


5 
16 


No Stake 

No Stake 

St. 1 W 




19 
25 
19 

I 


-3 
1 W 




-2 


28 




St. 1 W 


I w 


26 
15 


5 
30 


St. 1 L 
1 W 


- 1 
1 w 








1 L 


1 w 




+ 1 


29 


-1 
1 W 


10 
26 

6 


27 
14 


St. 1 L 
1 L 


8 



1 L 


-2 
1 W 




-1 
1 L 


-I 
1 L 




-2 
iL 


-2 
iL 




-3 


-3 



[»5] 



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Google 



Ten Days 


at Monte Carlo 




Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 




19 

16 

9 
12 

19 

34 

3 

30 
36 


-3 

I W 


26 

24 
31 


30 
7 
27 
23 
34 
16 

14 

34 
32 
16 

32 


-9 
I W 


4 


-2 

I L 


-8 
1 W 


26 


-3 
iL 


-7 
1 W 




-4 
iL 


-6 
iW 




"!l 


"fw 




-6 
1 W 


-4 
I W 


IO 


"!l 


~ 3 
1 W 


26 


-6 
1 L 


-2 
iL 




-7 
iL 


"?L 




-8 
1 L 


-4 
1 W 




-9 
1 W 


"?L 


29 


-8 
iL 


-4 
1 L 




-9 
1 W 


1 W 




-8 
1 L 


-4 
1 W 




-9 


-3 



[116] 



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Sixth 


Day*. 


s Play 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 




7 

30 
1 


-3 
1 W 


33 
28 

24 
20 

13 

17 


9 
25 


-I 
IW 


10 


-2 
1 L 




i L 


28 


"?L 


-1 
•1 L 


2 


-4 
1 W 


-2 
1 L 




-3 
1 L 


-3 
1 W 


22 


-4 
1 W 


-2 
rW 




-3 
1 W 


- 1 
1 W 


4 


-2 

I W 



1 w 




- 1 


+ 1 . 



Zero Fund. 
Fes. o 



Summary. 

Coups played ... 60 

Won 32 

Lost 28 

Units won 4 



4 units @ fcs. 100 = fcs. 400 

Add Zero Fund . o 

Total won . 400 

We win two units on the first two spins, and 
a third one on the 13th 'coup/ but the win- 
117 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

ning of the fourth one takes us just another 
hour's play. The reason of this is, that our 
luck is never sufficiently bad to allow us to 
double our unit. We get to -9 on the 28th 
'coup* and again on the 30th, but from that 
moment we begin to make up our ground, still 
playing stakes of one unit. Zero does not help 
us at all to-day, as it never appears during the 
whole stance. On the 60th 'coup* we at last 
win the fourth unit, and find that we have been 
just an hour and twenty minutes at the table. 
Feeling rather tired, we had a quiet dinner at 
the Me'tropole and went to bed. 



i« 



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CHAPTER X 

Sixth Ride— Peillon— Peille— Pic de Baudon— Seventh 
Day's Play— Restaurant of the Grand Hotel— 
Francois. 

I wonder how many, out of the hundreds of 
thousands of people who annually visit Monte 
Carlo, have ever seen the little village of Peillon. 
I don't suppose one in ten "thousand have ever 
heard of it, and certainly not one in twenty 
thousand have ever arrived there. And yet for 
the picturesqueness of its situation, and for the 
general beauty of the scenery surrounding it, 
I know of no place of easy access in the neigh- 
bourhood that surpasses it. 

As the crow flies, Peillon is not more than 
four miles due north of Monte Carlo, and the 
most direct way to arrive there is undoubtedly 
on foot from La Turbie: but with the aid of 
the * CremaiUere/ and by making use of the 
footpath at Laghet, it also makes a very charm- 
ing excursion for cyclists. 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

As we shall not be near any restaurant at 
lunch-time, it is best to strap a packet of sand- 
wiches on to the handle of your bicycle before 
starting on this expedition ; you can also slip a 
flask of whisky-and-water into your pocket, 
though this is not really necessary, as we shall 
pass several Buvettes on the way, where very 
drinkable native wine can be obtained. 

The best way for pedestrians making an 
excursion of this kind, if their party consists of 
half-a-dozen people, including ladies, is to take 
up a luncheon-basket in the train to La Turbie, 
and have it strapped on to a donkey. There 
are two or three men with donkeys there, who 
are accustomed to carrying lunch and acting as 
guides at the same time. There are several 
splendid walks to be made, starting from La 
Turbie ; the one to Peillon and Peille, and then 
down into Mentone vi& Gorbio, being an ex- 
ceedingly beautiful expedition, though rather 
long ; and there is another fine walk right round 
Mont Agel and down to Cabb£ Roquebrune 
Station. The air on these mountains is most 
invigorating, and the scenery on a clear day 
superb. 

We take the train to La Turbie and ride from 
there to Laghet, where we find a couple of boys 
to help to carry our machines down on to the 
road to Trinity Victor, exactly as described on 



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Peillon 

page B6. I hear, by the way, that they con- 
template making the quarter of a mile required 
to join these two roads at an early date, when 
the expedition here described will become 
possible for carriages. 

On arriving at Trinity Victor, we turn to the 
right and continue up the left bank of the river 
Paillon, till we come to the village of Drap 
(pronounced Drappe), about one kilometre from 
where we turned into the main road. We ride 
I on through Drap, and continue for about 

j another kilometre and a half, till we come to a 

fine bridge crossing the Paillon, which flows 
1 down a valley on our right, and joins a large 

| tributary here. 

! Immediately after crossing this bridge, we 

1 turn to the right and ride up this valley. The 

( road is marked No. 21, so there can be no mis- 

take about it. We are now in one of the most 
• charming little valleys of the whole neighbour- 

| hood. It is rather narrow in places, but beauti- 

, fully wooded : the road is also narrow but with 

i a very fair surface, and a gradient against us, 

> which is almost imperceptible. There is an air 

of restfulness and peace about this little valley 
which is irresistible, and one feels for a few 
I miles at least that one has left the haunts of the 

j ' scorcher ' and the ' petroleum fiend ' behind. 

Turning a corner about two miles and a half 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

from the main road, the little village of Peillon 
suddenly comes into view. Perched on the 
crest of a mountain, which rises up from the 
centre of the valley, it seems to all appearances 
as inaccessible as an eagle's nest. 

And by this time the traveller, with any 
curiosity, will no doubt begin to wonder why 
so many villages in this part of the world were 
built in such apparently inaccessible spots. The 
reason of course was for their own self-defence, 
not against their neighbours, but against the 
frequent attacks of Algerian pirates. Whenever 
these corsairs could not find a ship to pillage, 
they would swoop down on the nearest coast, 
and kill or carry off the inhabitants of any village 
they were fortunate enough to surprise. Raids 
such as" these were of frequent occurrence in 
this part of the country, all through the Middle 
Ages, and the natives do not appear to have been 
quite secure from them until well into the 
nineteenth century. 

But although Peillon is 1600 feet above the 
sea, it is easily reached from the road in about 
half-an-hour. It is, however, rather a steep 
climb, and the view from the top disappointing, 
considering the extreme beauty of the scenery 
from below. From an artist's point of view, I 
know of no place for many miles round Monte 
Carlo that can be compared with Peillon for 

12Z 



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Peille 

picturesqueness, and one cannot help thinking 
what a superb picture Turner would have made 
of it. 

After stopping for five minutes to admire the 
scenery, we continue along the road and turn 
to the left just beneath the village, and after 
pursuing this branch for about two and a half 
kilometres, we arrive at the Buvette where we 
intend to lunch. This is called the 'Point 
de la Grave/ and is about fifteen kilometres 
from the Monastery of Laghet We can here 
i obtain some native wine, and if necessary they 

would no doubt be glad to give you some boiled 
eggs or even an omelette, but it is better to 
bring some sandwiches, in case their supplies 
T . have run out. 

i After lunch we went for a short stroll and 

f admired the fine view of the little village of 

( Peille, which is situated above us to the north- 

/ east 2000 feet above the sea, but fully sheltered 

J by the majestic Mount Baudon, which towers up 

( behind it for at least another 2000 feet. The 

1 * Pic de Baudon is the highest point for many 
• miles round, and is nearly 400 feet higher than 

Mont Agel, the lofty peak immediately behind 
! Monte Carlo. 

I From the Buvette to Nice is only about 

j fifteen kilometres, and being downhill all the 

( way, can easily be ridden in about an hour. At 

( • I2 3 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

Nice we took an early train to Monte Carlo, and 
were in our places at the Casino soon after five. 
The table ran as follows : 

SEVENTH DAY'S PLAY. 



Black. 


Red. , 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


17 
II 
26 


30 

34 
32 

5 

> 
25 


No Stake 
No Stake 
St. 1 L 
1 W 


28 
13 
13 
20 
10 




-2 

i L 


"fw 





1 L 




-2 

1 w 




- 1 
1 L 


* 


-I 
1 w 




-2 
1 L 


28 



1 w 




-3 
1 W 




+ I 




-2 
1 W 




13 


31 
24 
24 
22 


23 


St iL 




-1 
1 L 


1 w 


26 







-2 
1 W 


iL 


4 


— 1 


i 


- 1 
1 L 


1 W 






-2 
1 L 



1 w 






29 


-3 
1 W 


+ I 




-2 









[124] 



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* 


Seventh 


Day's Play 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 




12 
34 

18 
16 
34 
32 

23 
12 


I L 
1 L 


17 
13 

2 
22 


9 
I 

9 

34 

' 27 

12 

21 

7 

3 

23 


"IL 


II 


-2 

1 L 


- 4 
1 L 




"fw 


"fw 




-2 

i L 


- 4 
1 L 




"?w 


"?L 




-2 

I w 


- 6 
1 L 


35 


-I 

iL 


"?L 




-2 
1 W 


- 8 
1 L 




- 1 

1 L 


- 9 
iL 


. 


- 2 

1 L 


- 10 

St 2W 


17 


- 3 
1 L 


- 8 

2L 


2 


- 4 
1 L 


-10 

2-W 


26 


"fw 


- 8 
2W 


4 


~ 4 
1 W 


-6 
2 W 




-3 


-4 



[125] 



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ten 1 


>ays 


at Monte Carlo 




Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


Black. | Red. 


Score. 


2 


5 
16 

19 
21 


-4 
2L 


8 

24 
28 


5 

3 
14 

30 
1 


-6 
2L 




-6 
2 W 


-8 
2 W 




-4 
2L 


-6 
2 w 


13 


-6 

2L 


-4 

2L 




-8 
2 W 


-6 

2W 


31 


-6 
2 W 


-4 

2W 


35 


-4 
2L 


-2 
2W 


2 


-6 
2 W 


O 

I w 




-4 

2L 


+ 1 












-6t. 





Zero Fund. 
Fes. 50 on 10th coup. 
50 „ 35th „ 
if? ., 44th „ 
Fes. 150 



Summary. 

Coups played . . .68 

Won 33 

Lost 35 

Units won 3 

3 units @ fcs. 100 as fcs. 300 

Add Zero Fund . . 150 

Total won . 450 



126 



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binner at 'The Grand* 

We win our first unit on the 17th 'coup,' 
and another one on the 22nd The table then 
begins to run against us, and zero comes up 
twice, so that on the 47 th spin we have to 
double our unit. Our luck then improves, and 
in the next twenty ' coups ' we once more bring 
the score level We win the 69th ' coup,' which 
makes us three units to the good, and having 
now 150 francs to the credit of * Zero Fund/ we 
are enabled to retire with 450 francs in hand. 
The stance lasted about an hour and a half. 
We then went over to the Grand Hotel, and 
ordered some dinner for eight o'clock. 

The cooking at the Grand is, in the opinion 
of most connoisseurs, the best in Monte Carlo. 
The restaurant is, after the Paris, the largest in 
the place, and it is admirably managed. This 
is not to be wondered at when one considers 
that the chairman of the Company is the Hon. 
Algernon Bourke, who has achieved such great 
success in London, both at Willis's Rooms and 
White's Club, whilst amongst the directors are 
Messrs. Ritz and £chenard, late of the Savoy 
in London, and at the present moment engaged 
in organizing what promises to be the best hotel 
o£ its size in the world, viz. the Hotel Ritz, 
in the Place Venddme, Paris. 

Mr. Ritz has the reputation of being the best 
organizer of hotels in Europe, and with Mon- 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

sieur Echenard to manage the restaurant, and 
Monsieur Escoffier as chef de cuisine, his success 
in Paris is assured. 

But^to return to the restaurant of the Grand 
Hotel ; if you wish to be well looked after, you 
must get hold of Francis. He it is who here 
corresponds to Ciro in his own restaurant, and 
to Fleury at the Paris. It is he who will allot 
you a table, and order you a dinner short or 
long, rich or plain, expensive or moderate in 
price, just as you may elect ; he will tell you 
what wine and what brandy to drink ; he will 
arrange your floral decorations, if there are ladies 
in your party ; and when half-past eight arrives, 
he will tell you the names of all the celebrities 
in the room. 

But you must not forget one thing, and that 
is, that whilst Fleury is manager at the Paris, 
Fran£ois is here only maitre cPhdtcl, and as 
he is probably not paid at all by the Company, 
he is entirely dependent upon the generosity 
of the clients. You must therefore bring it 
home to him in an unmistakable manner that 
you desire his personal attention. Not only 
will you never have cause to regret it, but 
you will even save money in the long run by 
being generous. The fact of the matter is, 
that not one Englishman in a hundred knows 
how to order a dinner in a French restaurant, 
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Francois 

and he will often increase his bill 30 per cent, 
through ignorance of the customs of the place. 
I know a man who goes and stops at the 
Grand for about ten days every year. Being 
most hospitably inclined he usually has a dinner- 
party every other night. The first thing he does 
on arrival is to enlist Frangois' services with 
a handsome douceur, and not only does he get 
more attention than any one in the restaurant, 
but he has probably saved the amount of his 
tip on the first two dinner-parties. As he very 
justly remarks: "Supposing we are a party of 
twelve, I should, if left to myself, probably order 
nine portions of soup, fish, and asparagus, where- 
as Francois orders me about five of each and 
makes them go round, and with asparagus alone 
at ten francs a portion, there is probably fifty 
francs saved on the first large party I give." 

English people who Ijave not travelled much 
do not realize the extent to which the pourboire 
system is carried on in France, and if they have 
cause to complain of the inattention or incivility 
of servants, it is entirely due to their own stingi- 
ness. As a matter of fact hardly any of the 
chambermaids, waiters, or porters at the hotels 
are paid at all, and at a restaurant like the 
\ Paris or the Grand at Monte Carlo, the 

I waiters probably have to pay the hotel as much 



as ten francs a day for being allowed to wait at 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

table. But so thoroughly is the system now 
recognized on the Continent, and also in the 
first-class places in London, that I have known 
waiters paying 7.50 francs and jo francs per 
day, who were able to save 200 francs a month. 
The result is that where so much liberality 
prevails, the stingy people will be made to suffer. 

The following is a very good scale on which 
to base your pourboires^ and without being ex- 
travagant will assure you good attendance in 
any restaurant. On a bill of from one to 50 
francs, 10 per cent, of the bill; from 50 francs 
to 500 francs, about 7^ per cent. ; and if over 
500 francs, about 5 per cent English people 
have the idea that a franc a head is the proper 
tip to give, and I have often seen rich English- 
men after a long dinner of five people at a 
# restaurant like the Grand, where the bill pro- 
bably came to about 180 francs, give the waiters 
5 francs, when from a liberal customer they 
would have got as much as twelve. The con- 
sequence is, that the attention they receive 
diminishes every time they visit that particular 
restaurant. - 

People may well argue that to increase your 
tips in proportion to the amount of your bill is 
a very bad system, as it encourages the waiters 
to run up the total of your bill. I cannot deny 
that this seems logical, but can only repeat that 
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Distinguished Visitors 



the system is recognized and followed by most 
people in first-class French restaurants, and this 
being so, if you attempt to fight against it, you 
will be sure to suffer from inattention. 

Frank was much too old a hand not to be ' 
conversant with all these little details, and having 
secured the services of Frangois, and left the 
ordering of the dinner to him, we were given a 
table in the first room, which is specially re- 
served for the best customers of the house. 
When the season is in .full swing, the company 
in this particular room is always select, and is 
generally made up of some of the smartest 
people in London. 
j On the left, as we enter the room, Mr. and 

/ Mrs. William McEwan are entertaining the Duke 

' of Cambridge and a party of friends. Next to 

( them Miss Fleetwood Wilson is giving a small 

I dinner to meet the Grand Duke Michael and 

1 the Countess Torby. The Prince of Wales is 

'. at another table with Lord and Lady St. Oswald, 

/ Sir Edward and Lady Colebrooke, Princess 

' Henry of Pless, Miss Agnes Keyser, Lord 

( Rowton, and Sir Arthur Sullivan. 

,' Mr. Gordon Bennett and Mr. H. Cosmo 

! Bonsor, M.P. are also dispensing lavish hospi- 

tality, while the Duke and Duchess of Marl- 
/ borough may be seen dining tttc-h-tttc in a 

> corner of the room. As all the tables are 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

decorated with masses of roses and carnations, 
the sight is a particularly gay and animated 
one. 
Watch Francois as he cuts up a Rouennais 
' duck in the twinkling of an eye and pops the 
carcase into a press for the juice to be 
squeezed out ! Artistic carving is cultivated at 
a place like this, and ducks, chicken, woodcock, 
saddles of lamb, and entrecdtes seem to come all 
alike to Fran$ois. They are cut up and dis- 
pensed to their respective tables with the most 
astonishing rapidity. The following is the dinner 
we had, and is a very fair sample of what the 
Grand Hotel does best: 

Hors d'CEuvre. 

Petite Marmite. 

Filets de Sole Walewska. 

Noisettes de Mouton, Richelieu. 

B£cassines en Casserole. 

Salade. 

Asperges d'Argenteuil, Sauce Mousseline. 

Mandarines glac&s. 

Cafe. 

J7».— St Marceaux, 1889, Vin Brut. 

Liqueur. — Curacoa Marnier, Cordon Rouge. 

There are two dishes on the above menu 

' which may be said to be specialities of the 

Grand, viz. the Sole Walewska and the 

Mandarines glacSes ; I recommend you to 

try them both. The St. Marceaux Brut, of 1889 

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Dinner at 'The Grand' 

is probably the best champagne in Monte Carlo, 
and the Cura^oa Marnier is a most delicious 
liqueur, but be sure you get the Cordon 
Rouge. 

Our bill was as follows : 



Grand Hotel, Monte Carlo. 



2 Couverts . . . 

St. Marceaux Brut, 1889 

Hors d'CEuvre . 

Mamniitc 

Sole Walewska . 

Noisettes de Monton 

Blcassines, Salade 

Asperges d'Argenteuil 

Mandarines glacees 

2 Cafes 

2 Verres Marnier, Cordon Rouge 



fit. 

1 

*9 
1 

4 
5 



12 

3 

2 

4 



50 



Total 64 50 



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CHAPTER XI 

Seventh Ride — The Man who played successfully for Ten 
Years — Cagnes — Biot — Antibes — Juan-les-Pins — Cap 
d'Antibes— Eighth Day's Play— Hotel Terminus at 
Nice. 

Having now won every day for a week, we 
found that we were beginning to attract a certain 
amount of attention in Monte Carlo, and our 
system began to be discussed by the gossips at 
the M&ropole. We had previously agreed to 
let no one into the secret of how much we won, 
or how we did it If any one asked us how we 
were getting on, we simply told them that we 
were still winning, and the result was, that most 
exaggerated accounts of our doings were daily 
repeated. 

There was one old Englishman in our hotel 

called W , who was crazy on the subject of 

systems. He had spent his whole life in 

travelling about from one gambling resort to 

another, and being a most superstitious and 

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J 



The Successful Player 



excitable person and an extremely bad gambler, 
he found very little difficulty in losing about two- 
thirds of his income, playing at the different 
tables he visited. 

He professed to have tried every system that 
was ever invented without succeeding in winning, 
and nothing annoyed him more than to be 
told that it was possible to win on a system. 
The fact of the matter was, that he had never 
given any system a fair chance, as he was much 
too excitable, and had very little capital His 
usual game was to take five louis over to the 
Casino, but whatever luck he was in, he never 
used to bring anything back; sometimes he 
would lose all his capital in a very short time, 
but sometimes, when he was in luck, he would 
turn his five louis into ;£ioo. Whichever it 
was, it did not seem to make any difference, 
for he would invariably remain at the tables 
until the whole of the ;£ioo was gone. His 
only chance of ever coming out a winner was to 
be overtaken by the clock, and turned out of the 
Rooms at closing time, before he had been able 
to lose back all his winnings. Unfortunately 
for him this was a very rare occurrence, as he 
generally started playing too early in the day. 

When some one informed him that we were 



/ supposed to have an infallible system, and had 

> won every day for a week, he was very scornful, 

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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

and came to me with such an officious and 
patronizing kind of manner that I resolved to 
"take a rise out of him." 

" Do you imagine," he said, " that you have 
really discovered a system that is any good ? " 

I told him that as far as we had tried it, we 
were very well satisfied with our experiments. 

" Ah," he said, " you may perhaps have won 
for a day or two, by exceptionally good luck, but 
if you think it is going to last, you will very soon 
find out your mistake. You can't really suppose 
that it is possible to play here every day and 
make money ? " This in his most compassionate 
tone of voice. 

" It may seem very strange to you," I^replied, 
" but I am foolish enough to believe in such a 
possibility." 

" Then," he said, " you must be mad. Has it 
never struck you that if such a thing were 
possible, there would be hundreds of people here 
doing it ? Now do you know any one who has 
done it, even every day for a year ? " By this 
time quite a little crowd had^ collected round us 
in the hall of the Me'tropole, listening to the 
discussion. 

" Yes," I said, " I do know a man who has 
played here every day of his life for the last ten 
years and made money all the time." 

" Quite impossible, utterly impossible," said 
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The Successful Player 



W " Why, such a thing has never been 

known since gambling was first invented ! " 

"Gambling,"! replied quietly, "I said nothing 
about gambling; the man I am referring to plays 
the violin in the orchestra I " 

Our excitable friend withdrew amid roars of 
laughter, and he never wished to discuss systems 
with me again after that day. 

Our programme to-day was to have a ride of 
about forty-five kilometres, which was rather more 
than our usual distance ; but the road traversed 
is fiat almost all the way, and as it follows the 
railway the rider can always take a train in the 
event of fatigue. 

We take the 9.40 a.m train from Monte Carlo 
to Cagnes, which is twelve kilometres the other 
' side of Nice. On leaving the station we find 

I ourselves on the Route Nationale from Nice to 

( Cannes, and a good, broad, fiat road it is, with 

' a fair surface in good weather. We turn to the 

; left and ride out of the village towards Cannes. 

( After going three kilometres, we come to 

; . , about as fine a piece of road for * scorching ' as 

I the most fastidious of 'scorchers' can desire. 

1 It is dead fiat for five kilometres, perfectly 

I straight, and with hardly any traffic except on 

.' Sundays, when you will find it well patronized 

I by cyclists and motors. All can turn on full 

I speed here, for it is perfectly safe, and there is 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

no scenery to distract one. Six kilometres after 
leaving Cagnes, we notice a road leading off to 
the right. This goes to Biot, an interesting 
little village built on a hill about four kilometres 
from the Route Nationale. This would make a 
nice little excursion for any one who chose to 
ride out from Nice and back, but one would 
have to take sandwiches, as the restaurant at 
Biot is not to be depended upon except for 
native wine. The total distance from Nice to 
Biot and back is about forty-three kilometres. 

We continue on our way and soon come to 
Antibes, which is about ten kilometres from 
Cagnes. The main road does not enter the 
town, but skirts it on the north side, and instead 
of turning to the left and entering the fortifica- 
tions we continue along the road to Cannes 
down an avenue of trees. We then mount a 
stiffish incline of about 300 yards, cross a rail- 
way bridge, and see the station of Juan-les-Pins 
on our left. Here we cross the line at a level 
crossing and ask for the Grand Hotel, which is 
close to the station. 

The rider can either lunch here,* or can ride 
on another two kilometres to the hotel at Cap 
d'Antibes. Both are good hotels, where they 
provide a very fair lunch at a moderate price ; 
both have nice gardens in which to drink your 
coffee and smoke a cigar, but of the two views 
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Antibe* 

we preferred that from Juan-les-Pins, and we 
were lucky enough to find the French Mediter- 
ranean Squadron at anchor in the roadstead. 

After lunch we rode round Cap d' Antibes, 
and into the little town from the south-west. If 
there is not much to be seen in the town itself, 
at any rate there is one of the finest views on 
the whole Riviera from just outside it. 

You get the little harbour in the foreground, 
well filled with fishing-boats; beyond is the town 
and the picturesque old. Fort, whilst the back- 
ground is a magnificent range of snow mountains. 
This is by far the finest view of the Maritime 
Alps that can be obtained within easy reach of 
Monte Carlo, and late in the afternoon of a 
clear day it makes a really beautiful picture. 

Antibes used to be considered a place of 
great strength, and was no doubt strongly forti- 
fied owing to its being until i860 the last 
seaboard town in France. Both the breakwater 
and the old fortifications were constructed by the 
great engineer Vauban, and the old Fort must 
have been almost impregnable before the days 
of modern artillery. The town was bombarded 
and nearly demolished by the English Fleet on 

j three different occasions. 

1 The ride back from Antibes to Nice is about 

twenty-two kilometres, and needs little descrip- 

/ tion, as the ground has all been traversed on a 

[ former occasion. Just before entering Cagnes 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

we cross the river Loup, and get a fine view of 
the Castle of Villeneuve-Loubet, standing on a 
hill about two miles to our left. 

We reach Nice in time to have some tea, and 
catch the five o'clock train to Monte Carlo. We 
commenced operations at the Casino soon after 
six, when the following numbers appeared : 

EIGHTH DAY'S PLAY. 



Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


33 


14 
25 


No Stake 

No Stake 

St. 1 W 


20 

22 

13 

i 
4 


27 
27 
30 

- 23 


- 5 
I L 




- 6 




32 

5 
9 

23 

1 
25 


St. 1 L 
iL 


1 W 


3 1 


"?L 




- 2 
iL 


6 


- 6 




"!l 


1 W 




-?L 




- 4 
1 L 




- 6 
1 W 


29 


- 5 
1 L 


1 W 




- 6 
1 W 








- 5 
1 L 


" 4 xL 








- 6 
1 W 


"IL 




- 5 


- 6 



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Eighth Day's Play 



Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 




16 
3 

25 

30 

21 

9 

3 

25 


-6 

iL 


2 

22 
24 


21 

34 
16 
12 
34 

3 
16 

21 

3 
36 

23 


- 6 

iL 




"II 


- 7 
1 W 


20 


- 8 
iL 


- 6 
1 L 




"?w 


- 7 
1 W 


24 


- 8 
1 W 


- 6 
1 W 




- 7 
1 W 


"lw 


10 


- 6 
1 W 


- 4 
1 W 




1 W 


1 W 




"!l 


- 2 
1 w 




I w 


- I 
1 L 


35 


- 4 
1 L 


- 2 
1 W 


10 


Ml 


- 1 
1 L 




- 6 
1 L 


- 2 
iL 


2 


-7 
1 W 


- 3 
1 W 




- 6 


- 2 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 



Black. 


Red 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


II 


• 12 


.- 2 

l w 


35 





I W 




- I 
I w 


4- I 






18 


+ IW 








Zero Fund. 

Fcs. 50 on 1 8th coup 

50 » 34th „ 
Fes. ico 



Summary. 

"oups played 51 

Won . . 27 

Lost . . 24 

Units won . 3 



3 units ® fcs. 100 = fcs. 300 

Add Zero Fund . . 100 

Total won . 400 



We win a unit on the very first ' coup,' and 
afterwards come in for an adverse run of six. A 
long struggle then takes place between the Bank 
and ourselves. We arrive at - 9 on two differ- 
ent occasions, but are never able to double the 
unit, as our luck always turns before - 10 is 
reached. 

However, our patience is rewarded at last, 
and we eventually come in for eight Reds, and 
an unfinished run of seven intermittences. This, 
enables us to win another two units, and as we 
have now 100 francs to the credit of 'Zero 
Fund,' we can leave off winners of 400 francs. 
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H6tel Terminus, Nice 



As we intended to take the first train on the 
following morning from Nice to Puget-Thdniers, 
it was necessary for us to sleep at Nice. We 
accordingly had an early dinner at the M&ro- 
pole, and took our bags and * bikes' over to 
Nice by the 9.45 p.m. train. 

We put up at the Terminus, which is one 
of the most comfortable and best managed 
hotels in the place, and it is most conveniently 
situated just opposite the railway-station. As 
we had to turn out the next morning at six, we 
went straight to bed on our arrival 



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CHAPTER XII 

Eighth Ride— Puget-Theniers— Entrevaux— Touet de 
Beuil— La Mescla— St. Martin du Var— Ninth Day's 
Play. 

In order to get to Puget-Th^niers in time to 
visit Entrevaux and have a comfortable ride 
home, it is necessary to leave Nice by the 6.50 
a.m. train. 

The station of the Sud de la France railway 
is about three minutes' ride from the Hotel 
Terminus, and is to the north of the P. L. M. 
line, about a quarter of a mile up the. Avenue 
de la Gare. If you should make the trip on a 
Sunday or nfite day, it is advisable to arrive at 
the station in good time, as there is sure to be a 
crowd, and if you are late your bicycle may get 
left behind. 

The railway leaves Nice to the north-west, up 

the pretty little valley of the Magnan, and after 

about a quarter of an hour we stop at the station 

of St. Isidore. Early May is the time to see 

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Nice to Puget-Thenier* 

this part of the line in all its beauty, with every 
hedge a rose-garden, and every field a mass of 
wild-flowers and poppies. 

Soon after leaving St. Isidore, we emerge into 
the valley of the Var, and arrive at Colomars 
at 7.30. The view from Colomars station has 
already been described in Chapter VIII. Let 
us hope that you will be as lucky as we were, 
and have a perfectly clear day for your excursion, 
as the beauty of the scene is considerably 
diminished when the tops of the mountains are 
hidden in mist. A good volume of water in the 
river is also required to add to the grandeur. 

We were extremely fortunate in both these 
respects, but were not so lucky as regards the 
wind. There was a good stiff breeze blowing 
right up the valley, which was quite sufficient to 
prevent us from ' coasting ' at any part of the 
ride home. Unfortunately for cyclists, the wind 
has a tendency to blow up this valley, and I 
have experienced it so strong, that although the 
road descends the whole way to Colomars, in 
some places it seemed to us like hill climbing. 

After leaving Colomars, instead of crossing 
the river and climbing the hill to Gattiferes, the 
train continues straight up the valley, and follows 
the river Var for the remainder of the journey. 
Picturesque little villages will be seen perched 
high on the mountains on each side of the line. 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

To the right La Roquette, and to the left 
Bonson, are the two most remarkable, the 
latter being built on the edge of a cliff rising 
sheer out of the valley to an altitude of over 
iooo feet. 

After leaving St. Martin du Var, the moun- 
tains close in, and the line runs for several 
kilometres through a narrow gorge, in some 
places not more than sixty yards wide. At La 
Mescla the railway, which has hitherto been 
going due north, suddenly curves round to the 
left, and starts running in an almost westerly 
direction ; and this course it pursues for the rest 
of the journey. Several tributaries flow into the 
Var, all the important ones coming from the 
east or north. The first of these is the river 
Vesubie, the next La Tin^e, and then the pretty 
little torrent of Cians (famous for its trout), 
which joins the main stream fifty-five kilometres 
from Nice. 

At Touet de Beuil it is advisable to leave 
word at the station that you require lunch for 
your party at about mid-day. They will deliver 
your message at the Hotel Latty, which is just 
opposite, and you will then find the dejeuner all 
ready on your arrival. .Should your party con- 
sist of more than four, it would be better to 
send them a wire the day before, as no doubt 
supplies are sometimes rather limited in these 
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Entrevaux 



out-of-the-way places. We arrive at Puget- 
Th&riers at 9.35. 

There is absolutely nothing of interest to be 
seen here, so we mount our machines and ride 
straight up the valley to Entrevaux. This is an 
almost flat ride of six kilometres, and we found 
it particularly easy with the wind behind us all 
the way. And here let me warn you, that 
although we lay no claim to the distinction of 
having discovered the little town of Entrevaux, 
nevertheless its existence is completely ignored 
by nearly all the guide-books to the Riviera. 
This is all the more extraordinary when you 
come to consider that there are few more inter- 
esting places in the whole neighbourhood. Its 
curious situation, its picturesque old drawbridge, 
and its imposing-looking fortress, all make it 
well worth a visit 

The river Var here bends sharply round to 
the north, at something more than a right angle, 
and the town being built inside the curve made 
by the stream, it is surrounded on three sides 
by a roaring torrent. There is no access to it 
from behind, as it is built up the side of a 
mountain, the summit of which is crowned by 
an apparently impregnable fortress, commanding 
'{ the valley to the east and west. 

Owing to the great strength of its position, 
Entrevaux has been the scene of many a bloody 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

encounter. It was taken by Charles V. in 1536, 
but the citadel was subsequently recaptured by 
the inhabitants and mountaineers, and given by 
them to Francis I., who granted them numerous 
privileges in return. Since that time it has 
always belonged to France, and it was probably 
the only town on the east side of the river that 
was French ; as up to the year i860, and before 
the annexation of Nice, the Var was the bound- 
ary between France and Italy. 

It seems, that when attacked, the inhabitants 
used to raise the drawbridge and defend the 
approaches to the town, as long as possible, 
from the battlements below. If the enemy 
succeeded in crossing the river and making a 
breach in the walls, the defenders would then 
retire to the fortress on the hill, where they 
were no doubt able to hold out for many weeks, 
and make things very uncomfortable for the 
attacking party below. The only approach to 
the citadel is by a steep and narrow causeway, 
through a series of about twenty gateways, each 
of which in turn could doubtless have been 
held by a few brave men against an entire 
army. 

Strangers have to get special permission to 
visit the fortress, and carriages are not allowed 
to cross the drawbridge owing to the narrowness 
of the streets of the town. 
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Touet de Beuil 



Having thoroughly explored Entrevaux, we 
turn our faces homewards, and ride down the 
valley. 

Puget-TWniers being a dirty and evil-smelling 
village, without apparently a single redeeming 
feature, we ride straight through it without 
dismounting. 

The road, the river, and the railway run 
parallel to one another the whole way down to 
Colomars, and so good is the surface, and so 
continuous the gradual. descent, that on a still 
day one can 'coast* with safety almost the 
entire distance from Puget-Th^niers to St. 
Martin du Var. 

About four miles down the road an enormous 
square-shaped mountain appears in front of us 
like a mighty fortress commanding the valley, 
and just beyond this we cross the river Cians 
and arrive at Touet de Beuil. The Hdtel Latty 
is down a road to the right, close to the railway- 
station. Here they will give you a very good 
lunch, considering the distance from civilization, 
and the native white wine is dry, and exceed- 
ingly palatable. 

If you feel sufficiently energetic after lunch, 
you should certainly climb up and explore the 
little village of Touet de Beuil ; the view from 
the church being very striking. The curious 
feature about the place is that the church is 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

built on the top of a torrent, the waters of which 
run right underneath the edifice. 

From Touet de Beuil to La V&ubie is per- 
haps the most interesting part of our ride, the 
scenery all round La Mescla being especially 
fine. So narrow is the gorge in places, that 
there is only just room for the road and the 
river, the railway having to tunnel through the 
solid rock. Occasionally even the road has to 
be taken through short tunnels. Just after 
crossing the bridge at La Mescla we notice a 
road branching off to the left : this runs right 
up the valley of La Tin& to a place called 
St. Sauvevfr, which is about the same distance 
from Nice as Puget-Th&iiers. 

It all depends upon the wind and the con- 
dition of the rider how much further down the 
valley you will ride. By the time we reached 
La V&ubie we had done forty-seven kilometres, 
and were still comparatively fresh. Had there 
been no wind we should have ridden down to 
Colomars, but as it was, we decided to ride only 
as far as St Martin du Var, which gave us 
altogether a ride of about fifty-three kilometres. 
Here we took the five o'clock train, which 
brought us to Nice soon after six. 

As we did not reach Monte Carlo till seven 
o'clock, we decided that the best thing would be 
to have some tea and a couple of boiled eggs 
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Ninth Day's Play 



before going to the Casino, seeing we were 
likely to find the rooms too crowded if we 
waited till after dinner. By these means we 
were able to start playing at eight o'clock, and 
were ensured a nice quiet hour at least before 
the crowd came in. It so happened that the 
table was in the best of humours, and we caught 
it running most favourably for our system. The 
following were the figures of the play : 



NINTH DAY'S PLAY. 



Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 




12 
5 

27 
32 


No Stake 
No Stake 


2 

1 

i 


18 
25 

7 
9 


O 
I L 


17 

2 


St. 1 L 
1 L 


- 1 
1 W 


29 


-2 
1 L 



1 L 


24 


-3 
1 W 


- 1 
1 W 


29 


-2 

1 w 



1 w 




- 1 
1 L 


+ 1 


13 


-2 
1 W 


31 


7 
I. 

1 


1 L 
1 W 




-1 
1 w 



1 L 







- 1 



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Ten Days 


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Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 




34 

3 

18 


-I 
I L 


8 

33 
33 

22 




O 
IW 


26 


-2 

iL 


+ 1 




-3 
1 W 




iL 
1 W 


8 


-2 
1 W 



1 W 




-I 

1 w 


+ 1 







15 


1 I W 



Zero Fund. 
Fes. 50 on 2nd coup. 
50,, "th „ 
5Q „ 16th „ 
150 



Summary. 

Coups played . . 

Won 

Lost 

Units won . . . 



26 

15 
11 
4 



4 units @ fcs. 100— fcs. 400 

Add Zero Fund . . 150 

Total won . .550 



We win our first unit on the 13th 'coup,' 
and have already got 100 francs to the credit of 
* Zero Fund.' 

In spite of another zero we win our second 
unit on the 22nd spin. We then find that we , 
are on a run of five Blacks, and are able to 
retire on the 26th 'coup,' the winners of four 
units, plus 150 francs to the credit of 'Zero 

Fund.' 

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Supper at Giro's 



As it was still quite early we went into the 
concert, which lasted till ten, and afterwards 
went over to Ciro's and had a nice light little 
supper, consisting of some devilled kidneys and 
a couple of snipe on toast, washed down with a 
bottle of Pommery. We then retired to the 
smoking-room of the Me'tropole for cigars, after 
which we felt quite ready for bed. 



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CHAPTER XIII 

Ninth Ride— Laghet— Contes— Nice - Riquier— Tenth 
Day's Play — Summary of Ten Days' Results — Total 
Expenses and Net Profit. 

As the expedition to Entrevaux had given, us 
rather a long day, we decided that our last ride 
should be a fairly short and easy one, enabling 
us to get back in good time to Monte Carlo. 
Frank accordingly proposed to take me up a 
hitherto unexplored valley to a little village 
called Contes. 

We started off by train to La Turbie, and 
thence vid Laghet to Trinite* Victor, exactly as 
described on page 86. After passing through 
Drap, instead of turning off to the right, up the 
valley of the Paillon to Peille, we keep straight 
along the main road for about another kilometre. 
We then see a road branching off to the left, 
and it is this that leads to Contes. 

The main road, which we leave at this point, 
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Contes 

continues to Escarfene and over the Col de 
Braus to Sospel, from whence there is a very 
good road leading down to Mentone; but this 
| is a ride which should only be undertaken by 

athletes, for the hills are tremendous, and in 
one place the road runs up to an altitude of 
over 3000 feet The distance by this route 
from Nice to Mentone is about sixty-five kilo- 
metres, but it is equal to over 100 on the flat. 

The branch road leading to Contes is rather 
cut up in places, and requires careful riding, but 
the distance from the Route Nationale to the 
village is only about four kilometres. We pass 
some hideous-looking cement works, and notice 
a road leading off to the right. This goes to 
La Vernea and Sclos, and would make a nice 
excursion for another day, if we had time ; the 
road, however, is bad and even dangerous in 
places. 

And now we see the little town of Contes 
about a mile off, built in terraces up the side of 
a mountain at the end of the valley. Contes is 
peaceful and homely in appearance, and gives 
one the idea of more prosperity than most of 
the neighbouring villages. The pretty little 
church in the centre, with its red spire, makes 
it wonderfully picturesque. 

The town is over 1200 feet above the sea, 
but is so surrounded by mountains, protecting 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

it from every cold wind, that the olive, vine, 
and orange tree all thrive there equally well, 
and indeed this little valley is especially famous 
both for its olives and wine. 

We see a restaurant straight in front of us, 
at the entrance to the town, and here we stop 
for lunch. The cooking was of the most primi- 
tive order, and I should recommend people who 
are at all fastidious to bring some sandwiches 
with them. The boiled eggs came up as if they 
had been reposing in lukewarm water for about 
a minute and a half, and the veal cutlets which 
followed were also half raw. Possibly fuel is 
costly in these parts ! There was no fault, how- 
ever, to be found with the white wine, which we 
found unusually refreshing. After lunch we 
climbed up the hill and had a look round the 
old village, but there is not very much of interest 
to be found there, with the exception of the 
church. 

We then mounted our machines and rode 
straight down the valley to Nice, a distance of 
about sixteen kilometres, downhill all the way. 
We took the train to Monte Carlo from Nipe- 
Riquier, which is rather nearer than Nice station 
for any one coming down the Paillon valley. 
On our arrival we had some tea, and went over 
to the Casino soon after five o'clock. 

The Bank was evidently determined to make 
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Tenth Day's Play 



one last effort to clean us out before our de- 
parture, and at one time they had actually won 
back nearly all our winnings for the last nine 
days. After this they could do no more, and 
we slowly but surely made up our lost ground, 
and were able to leave them utterly defeated on 
the 62nd 'coup.' 

TENTH DAY'S PLAY. 



Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


IS 
6 


16 
3 

19 


No Suke 
No Stake 
St. 1 L 
1 L 


13 
29 

2 

24 

33 


7 
21 

34. 


"?L 




~4 
1 L 




-2 
1 W 




-5 




-1 
1 L 


iL 


4 


-6 
1 W 




-2 
1 W 






28 


- 1 
I w 


"!l 









1 w 


-6 
1 L 




+ 1 


-7 
1 W 


26 




+ iW 






i 
10 


36 


1 L 
1 L 


-6 

iL 








-2 
1 L 


-7 
iL 




-3 


-8 



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Ten ] 


Days 


at Monte Carlo 




Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


Black. 


Red. 


| Score. 




7 
12 

9 
18 

30 
23 

1 


-8 
IL 


8 
II 
17 

31 

4 

2 
29 

6 

15 


27 
3 

16 
21 

30 


-22 
2 W 




-9 
IL 


-20 
2L 


22 


- IO 
St. 2L 


-22 
2L 


3' 


- 12 

2L 


-24 
2L 


20 


-14 

2 W 


-26 
2W 




- 12 
2L 


-24 
2L 




-14 
2L 


-26 

2L 


35 


-16 

2L 


-28 

2L 


10 


-18 

2L 


-30 

St. 3L 




-20 
2L 


-33 
3L 




-22 
2L 


-36 
3W 




-24 
2 W 


"~ 33 w 
3W 




-22 
2 W 


-30 
3L 


29 


-20 
2L 


-33 
3W 




-22 1 


-30 " 



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Hotel Terminus, Nice 



Black. 


Red. 


Score. 


1 Black. 


Red. 


Score. 




I 

23 
12 


-30 
3 W 


4 
13 


32 

25 
18 

5 


->5 
3W 


8 


-27 
3W 


-12 
3W 




-24 
3W 


- 9 
3W 


29 


-21 
3 W 


- 6 
3W 




-18 
3 W 


"II 




"SL 


-6 
3W 




-18 
3W 


-3 
3W 




-15 






Zero Fund. 
Fes. 50 on 9th coup. 

UP » 44th „ 
Fes. 200 



Summary. 

Coups played .... 62 

Won 27 

Lost 35 

Units won 2 

2 units @ fcs. 100 = fcs. 200 

Add Zero Fund . . 200 

Total won . 400 . 



The table funs fairly well at the commence- 
ment, and we win our first unit on the 7th 
'coup,' and another on the 8th. We then ex- 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

perience six consecutive losses, and four more 
shortly afterwards, which compels us to double 
our unit on the 23rd 'coup.' The table still 
continues to run very badly for us, and we en- 
counter ' series ' of six, three, and five consecu- 
tive losing ' coups ' ; this forces us to treble our 
unit on the 43rd spin, and on the 45th * coup ' 
we are as much as 3600 francs to the bad. 

The Bank, however, has now played itself 
entirely out, and it is our turn to have some luck. 
We come across six intermittences, and then a 
run of seven on the Red, and by the 62nd 
* coup ' we have made -the score level. This 
enables us to retire, as we have won two units, 
and have now got 200 francs to the credit of 
' Zero Fund.' 

Having concluded our transactions with the 
Casino, and booked our places in the Train de 
Luxe for England, on the following day, we 
decided to celebrate our triumph by giving a 
small dinner-party at Ciro's restaurant. Blundell 
was of course invited, and one or two people to 
whom he had introduced us during our stay in 
Monte Carlo. Altogether we made up a very 
cheery little party of eight, and were fortunate 
enough to find Monsieur Cirp in quite his best 
form. 

Next morning we amused ourselves by com- 
piling a Summary of our ten days' operations at 
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Summary of Ten Days' Play 

the Roulette Table. We found the result had 
been as follows : 

Coops played 495 

Won 242 

Lost 253 

Units won 29 

29 Units @ fcs. xco . . .fcs. 2900 

Add Zero Fund .... 1450 

Total won . 4350 

Not such a bad result, considering that the 
Bank had won eleven more ' coups ' than our- 
selves. 

We then made a rough estimate of our 
expenses for the trip, which came to just about 
3000 francs, as shown below ; 

Two First Return Tickets, abt. « fcs. 600 

Two Train de Luxe Return Supplements, abt. 500 

Excess luggage 20d 

Living expenses (ten days) .... 1500 

Extras, tips, etc. 200 

Total fcs. 3000 

There accordingly remained the sum of about 
1350 francs to be divided between us as net 
profit 



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CHAPTER XIV 

The Hotels and Restaurants of Monte Carlo— Monte Carlo 
Sharps and Swindlers —Hints to Visitors. 

As regards hotels at Monte Carlo there is plenty 
of choice. The three best at present are the 
M&ropole, the Grand, and the Hdtel de 
Paris, but in 1899 another will have to be 
added to this list, viz. the Riviera Palace Hotel 
at Bordina. 

People who have not travelled much, and 
who do not speak French, will probably prefer 
the M&ropole. Being one of the Gordon 
Hotels, it is of course thoroughly English in 
every respect. The architect was an English- 
man, the furniture is by Maple and Co., and 
the bath-rooms and sanitary arrangements by 
Jennings. The situation is unique, being built 
on the side of a hill overlooking the Casino 
Gardens, with a beautiful view across the Bay 
of Roquebrune extending to Bordighera. 
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Hotels of Monte Carlo 



The Grand Hotel now also belongs to an 
English company, and though the public re- 
ception-rooms and the situation are not quite 
equal to the M&ropole, the reputation of the 
cuisine is second to none. These two estab- 
lishments usually open on December i, and 
close about April 30. 

The H6tel de Paris, on the other hand, is 
open all the year round, and is one of the most 
cosmopolitan hotels in the world. English 
people are welcomed and made thoroughly 
comfortable, but it will be found that the foreign 
element usually predominates. The restaurant 
is essentially Parisian, and the wine-cellar the 
best on the Riviera. The Paris has the 
advantage of being the nearest hotel to the 
Casino. 

These three establishments are all expensive, 
and their prices will be found to be about on a 
par. 

After these come several first-class hotels, 
rather smaller, more unpretentious, and less 
expensive. 

The Hotel Victoria and the Prince de Galles 
belong to the Swiss firm of Rey Freres, 
and are as scrupulously clean and well-managed 
as most Swiss establishments. 

The clien&le of the Hdtel Windsor is al- 
most exclusively English, and this hotel can 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

be confidently recommended, the food being 
excellent and the charges moderate. 

Other hotels of the same class are the Hotel 
Royal, the St. James's, the Hotel Monte 
Carlo, and the Hotel Helder. The latter is 
a new establishment situated just above the 
M^tropole, and has already established a reput- 
ation for good cooking. 

People who require cheaper accommodation 
should try the Hotel de TEurope, which is just 
below the M&ropole and close to the railway- 
station. This belongs to Francois Rinjoux, the 
maltre (ThStel of the Grand, and manager of 
the restaurant of the Hotel Cecil in summer 
months. He gives you an excellent lunch or 
dinner for three francs or four francs respectively, 
wine being included, and he would probably take 
you en pension at very moderate rates. Fxangois 
possesses some of the best wine in Monte Carlo, 
his old Burgundies being especially good. 

The Hotel Savoy should also be mentioned 
for good cooking and good wine, but the charges 
are rather higher than at the Europe. 

People requiring an a /s carte restaurant, 
where they will not be overcharged, should try 
R£'s bar. behind the English chemist, or the 
Princess's Restaurant, a new establishment, the 
proprietor of which has had experience in Lon- 
don, both at the Criterion and Tivoli. 
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Pension Arrangements 



Should you intend only stopping a short time 
in Monte Carlo it will not be worth while to 
make 'pension arrangements. ' If you are making 
daily excursions, as we were, you will be paying 
for a lunch you will never eat; besides, you are 
sure to. wish to dine out once or twice a week. 
Most of the hotels threaten to charge more for 
the rooms, if you take meals outside, but it is a 
threat that is seldom put into force. 

It would seem almost unnecessary to warn 
people to be most careful about making ac- 
quaintances, either at the tables, in the hotels, 
or in railway travelling on the Riviera. During 
four months of the year this part of the world 
seems to be the happy hunting-ground of the 
cleverest and most refined scoundrels of Europe. 

On the occasion of my first visit to Monte 
Carlo, I was dining alone one evening, when at 
the end of dinner a man, who had been sitting 
at a table close by, crossed over, and addressing 
me by name, reminded me that we had met 
some time ago at a London club in company of 

a certain Mr. W . He said his name was 

Elwes. Now I knew Mr. W quite well, and 

remembered the name of Elwes, but could not 
for the life of me recollect if we had really met 
or not. 

He asked me to dine with him the following 
evening, but as he seemed rather inclined to be 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

over friendly, and as there was a something in 
his manner which I did not quite like, I made 
some excuse and got out of it Whenever he 
saw me for the next day or two he was always 
trying to improve our acquaintance, but I 
noticed that he did not seem to have any other 
friends in the hotel. 

A few days later the English detective 
attached to the Casino came and asked me if I 
knew a man called Elwes. I told him the story 
of our acquaintance, and inquired if he knew 
anything of him. . He smiled grimly, and said : 
" Never you mind what I know, but I know 
quite enough to be sure he is after no good 
down here, and so told the Casino authorities to 
refuse him admission, and he then gave your 
name as a reference. 

" I don't mind telling you," he added, "that 
his real name is not Elwes, and you probably 
have never met him before in your life/* 

After this, of course I took every opportunity 
of showing Mr. Elwes that I did not care for his 
society, and shortly afterwards he disappeared. 

The detective would never tell me anything 
more about him that year, but the following 
season, about nine months afterwards, seeing me 
outside the Casino one day, he said : "By the 
way, .1 think I've got a newspaper cutting in my 
pocket-book which will interest you : read this." 
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Sharps and Swindlers 



And it certainly was interesting, for it was to 
the effect that John Ellison, alias Elwes, alias 
Grant (not to mention a few other aliases), had 
been sentenced at the Old Bailey to seven years' 
penal servitude for bank fraud. 

The detective then told me that Elwes had 
been for some time the chief of a notorious 
gang of swindlers, and that they had come down 
to Monte Carlo the year before, with a big 
scheme to defraud the Casino. The whole 
business had been nipped in the bud, by Elwes 
being refused admission. 

I well remember another and similar case. 
A well-dressed and gentlemanly little man, call- 
ing himself Dr. Pickering, was always trying to 
make acquaintances at the gambling-tables. He 
was very clever at it, for he would watch to see 
who your friends in the place were, and find 
out as much about them as possible. 

Having acquired a certain amount of informa- 
tion about you, he would come and sit next to 
you at the tables for several days in succession, 
and make himself extremely pleasant, and talk 
of several of your friends as if he knew them 
quite well. As a matter of fact, he had only 
scraped their acquaintance in the same way as 
your own, by making out to them that he knew 
you. 

In my own case he found out that a cousin 
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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

of mine went in for pony-racing, and commenced 
by informing me that my cousin Guy and he 
were great friends, " and saw a lot of one an- 
other pony-racing, don't you know." By these 
means, in about a month's time he had got to 
know a great number of people, including many 
ladies, and naturally the new-comers, seeing him 
talking to people they knew in 'the Rooms,' 
thought that he was ' all right.' So, in fact, did 
most of us until we heard one morning that a 
young Englishman had been drugged the night 
before, and relieved of 30,000 francs in hard 
cash at 'poker,' and that Dr. Pickering and two 
of his friends had left the place in a hurry. 

Of course when I asked my cousin about him, 
on my return to England, he could not remember 
ever having met the man, any more than Mr. 
W could remember Elwes. - 

Beware of people who are extra polite and 
anxious to assist you at the tables. A friend ot 
mine had an unpleasant experience, He could 
not get a seat at the Trente et Quarante, so 
had to stand and reach over the people's heads 
every time he wished to make a stake, or take 
off his winnings. He was playing in stakes of 
rive, louis, and sitting just in front of him was 
an extremely nice-looking, well-dressed Erench 
lady, who offered to hand up his money when- 
ever he won, to save him the trouble of reaching 
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over. He was of course very much obliged to 
her, and as she seemed to bring him luck, he 
stayed for half-an-hour or so at the same place, 
and won quite a nice little sum. It was only 
towards the end of his run that he thought the 
Bank had paid him one louis short on a certain 
winning stake, and when he found that he 
was certainly paid a louis too little on the next 
one he began to make a row. In the midst of 
the discussion with the croupier, the lady got up, 
saying something about " cette table m'apporte 
la guigne," and offered him her chair. The 
next day he met a friend who had had precisely 
the same experience, and they are now quite 
convinced that the lady had some cobbler's wax 
in the palm of her right glove, to which one louis 
adhered out of every little pile she handed up. 

Talking of cobbler's wax reminds me of a very 
clever swindle perpetrated about two years ago 
on a Monte Carlo jeweller. A distinguished- 



looking gentleman came into the shop, and 
) wished to look at some valuable diamond rings. 

' Several trays were brought out and their contents 

{ examined, when suddenly the jeweller missed a 

i ' ring worth about ^400. He at once accused 

{ the customer of stealing it, but the latter was 

most indignant, and expressed himself as 

perfectly willing to be searched on the premises 

by the police. 

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So the police were sent for, and be was taken 
into a private room and thoroughly searched, 
but of course no ring was discovered, and the 
unfortunate jeweller was obliged to bow the 
gentleman out of his establishment with the 
most profuse apologies. 

A short time afterwards a lady came into the 
shop and made some trifling purchase and went 
out again. The next morning, in dusting out 
the place, a piece of cobbler's wax was found 
underneath the counter, with the impression of 
the ring on it. The man had slipped the ring 
on to it whilst the jeweller's back was turned, 
and the lady, his accomplice, had doubtless 
removed it in the same way. 

Beware of the man who has the reputation, 
either of being extraordinarily lucky, or of pos- 
sessing an infallible system. There are several of 
these gentry, who have been hovering about the 
tables for years, and amongst them, I regret to 
say, one or two Englishmen. They encourage 
the idea that they always win in the long run, 
and endeavour to get unsuspecting people, 
generally youthful Englishmen, to gamble in 
partnership with them. Each is supposed to 
put in an equal amount of capital, and they 
start playing on a system together. 

It is ' all on the square ' at the commencement, 
and possibly you win a little the first day or two ; 
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The Partnership Swindle 

but one afternoon your partner will say to you 
at the tables, "It's beastly stuffy in here now; 
let's knock off for the present, and meet again 
after dinner, say about nine." He probably 
knows you are dining out, and are not likely to 
arrive till 9.15 or 9.30. You say " All right," and 
he takes charge of the capital. 

In the evening you arrive at about ten minutes 
past nine, and find him sitting at the table, with 
a very long face. He says, " I'm awfully sorry, 
old chap ; I got here rather before nine, but as 
the table seemed to be going well, and as. I 
thought you would be sure to arrive in a few 
minutes, I started playing alone. We've had 
one of the worst runs I've ever seen, and they've 
been and cleaned us out." 

He then shows you a card, marked with the 
numbers that are supposed to have come out, 
and of course you can say nothing. Next day 
he will probably tell you that such luck as you 
had on the day before does not occur more than 
once in six months, and will try and persuade 
you to provide new capital to get your losses 
back. But it is usually a case of ' once bit, 
twice shy,' and few are caught a second time. 

I knew a case where the same man played 
this trick successfully on no less than three 
different young men, within the space of a fort- 
night, and must have netted at least ^500. 
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He was a gentleman by birth, and very well 
connected, but so unscrupulous that I have no 
doubt whatever that he simply pocketed the 
money. 

I knew another and still more extraordinary 
case, of a tall good-looking young Englishman, 
called Krugh, who had most charming manners, 
and always sported the colours of a well-known 
London Club. He was dressed quietly and in 
the best of taste, and quite devoid of any flashi- 
ness or swagger. He had been to a good public 
school, and soon made a great number of friends 
in Monte Carlo and the neighbourhood. Ho 
was very much in request at picnics during the 
day, and cotillon parties at night. 

Krugh used to go in for unadulterated, bare- 
faced robbery, without any redeeming features, 
and as he was content with very small amounts, 
and usually victimized unsuspecting ladies, he 
carried it on undiscovered for about four months. 

He used to practise the partnership swindle to 
a great extent, but was quite satisfied to rob you 
of five or ten louis at a time. When ladies were 
confiding enough to let him hold their purses, 
he would deliberately steal as much as he 
thought would pass unnoticed. 

But one fine day the bubble burst. A man 

named R arrived in Monte Carlo, who had 

once been Krugh's best friend. It then trans- 
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A Society Thief 



pired that not only had Krugh been unable to 

resist stealing R *s money and jewellery, but 

had robbed several of R 's friends as well. 

A meeting of the victims took place in 
London, and they went in a body and informed 
Krugh that they intended to expose him. He 
went down on his knees and confessed the 
whole business, but begged so hard for mercy 
that they decided to let him off, provided he 
would resign from his Club and leave England. 

As soon as R heard that Krugh was still 

wearing the Club colours, he of course told all 
the people he knew in Monte Carlo about the 
whole business, and in about two days' time 
Krugh slunk off, and went to America. I have 
since heard that he was carrying on the same 
little game over there, and after robbing many 
people who had been most kind to him, he was 
given twenty-four hours in which to leave New 
York or go to prison. 

If you are playing on an even chance or a 
dozen, and leaving your winnings on the table 
to accumulate, it is as well to touch your pile 
with the rake, after every winning 'coup/ 
There is a sort of unwritten law, or at any rate 
etiquette, that if you touch a pile with the rake 
before the ' coup ' is played, and no one objects 
to your doing so, it establishes your claim 
to it. 

173 



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Ten Days at Monte Carlo 

There are plenty of sharpers on the look-out 
for beginners, who do not know this custom, 
and after touching your pile (sometimes as if 
by accident), they will then put in a claim for it. 

Should you have any money stolen, object at 
once and ask the croupier to pay you; if he 
should hesitate, leave your place and ask the 
' Chef de Partie ' to order him to pay you, and 
say that if he does not do so at once, you will 
appeal to the ' Directeur du Jour/ He will then 
usually pay you, but if he does not, make him 
send for the Director, and insist. Be very 
determined to get your money, but make as 
little noise as possible. They will almost always 
pay an Englishman, provided he insists and 
does not make a scene. 



i74 



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INDEX 



Administration of Casino, 

a, 3 *'. 33 « 
Algerian Pirates, 122 

Antibes, 238, 139 

Augustan Monument, 79 

' Avant Dernier/ 20 

Beauueu, 56, 72, 73 
Bercy Sauce, 103 
Bicycles, 29 
Biot, 138 
Blackmail, 35—37 
Bonson, 146 
Bordighera, 55 
Bordina, 54 
Boucher, 109 
Bouillabaisse, 88 
Bourke, Hon. A., 127 
Bristol Hotel, 69, 88 

Cab Fares, z8o, 181 
Cabbe" Roquebrune, 120 
Cagnes, 96, 114, 137—140 
Cannes, 96, 105, 107, 137 
Cap d'Afl, 68 
Cap d' Antibes, 138, 139 
Cap Martin, 42, 53, 58, 59 
Cap Martin Hotel; 57, 58 
Cap St. Hospice, 87 
Casino Customs, 32—37, 173 
Cemetery, 67 

Champagne St. Marceaux, 132 
Chateau Carbonnieux, 49 
Cimiez, 70 

Ciro and Ciro's Restaurant, 
43—48, 160 



Climate of Monte Carlo, 41 
Col de Braus, 155 
Colomars, 94, 105, 150 
Concerts, 74 
Condamine, 65 
Consul, English, 179 
Contes, 154—156 
Corniche Road, 57, 58 
Corsanego, Monsieur, 77 
Cremaillere, 53, 79, 119 
Curacoa Marnier, 133 
Custom House, 38 

Demi-monde, 102 
Dentist, English, 279 
Doctors, English, 179 
Drap, iai, 154 

Eden Hotel, 68 
Emperor of Austria, 59 
Empress Eugenie, 58 
Entrevaux, 105, 143 — 150 
Escarene, 155 
Esterels, 56, 70 
Expenses of Trip, 161 
• Ex Votos,' 81, 86 
E**. 55. 56, 69, 72 

Fleury, Monsieur, xoz— 204 
Fragonard, 206—222 
Francois, 228 — 233, 264 
French, mistakes m, 97— ioo 

Gattieres, 95, 245 
Gorbio, 220 
Gordon Hotels, 262 



175 



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Index 



Gorges du Loup, 105, 113 
Grand Hotel, Grasse, 107, 113 
Grand Hotel, Juan-les-Pins, 

138 . 

Grand Hotel, Monte Carlo, 

127—133, 163 
Grasse, 94, 105— 114 
Gratuities, scale of, 129—131 

Hotels of Monte Carlo, 162 
-165 

International Sleeping 
Car Company, 37, 54 

Jehin, Leon, 74 
Jerry Thomas, 46 
Tourney to Monte Carlo, 38 
Juan-les-Pins, 138, 139 

Kilometres, 55 

Laghet, 80—86, 119, 120 

La Mescla, 146, 150 

La Roquette, 146 

La Tinee, 146, 150 

La Turbie, 53, 73, 79, 120 

La Vernea, 155 

La Vesubie, 146, 150 

Latty Hotel, 146, 149 

Le Var, 03, 94, 145— 150 

London House, 71 

Loup, River, 114 

Magagnosc, 113 
Magnan Valley, 144 
Mails, 180 

Malet, Sir Edward, 67, 69 
Malvilan, Monsieur, 106—1x2 
Maple, Sir J. B., 69 
Maps of Riviera, 28 
Maritime Alps, 139 
Martello Tower, 88 
May, beauties of, 42, 144 
McCalmont, Mr. H., 69, 87 
Mentone, 58, 120, 155 
Meuopole Hotel, 41, 162 



Mistral, 41 
Mont Agel, 120 
Mont Boron, 70, 72 
Mostele, 49 

Nice, 56, 65, 70, 71, 87 

Orchestra of Casino, 74—77 

Paganini, 88 

Paillon River, 57, 86, 93, 121 

P. L. M. Railway, 78, 105 

Paris, Hdtel de, 100—104, 163 

Peille, 120, 123 

Peillon, 1x9, 123 

Pic de Baudon, 123 

' Plaques,' 18, 99 

Point de la Grave, 123 

Pourboires, scale of, 129— 131, 

181 
Press, 33, 36 
Prince of Wales, 58, 131 
Promenade des Anglais, 71, 

94 
Puget-Theniers, 93, 94, 143— 

150 

Regence, Restaurant de la 

71.87 
Regina Palace, 70 
Riquier, 156 
Ritz, Mr., 127 

Riviera Palace, Bordina, 162 
Riviera Palace, Nice, 54 
Roquebrune, 42, 54, 58 
Rothschild, Baroness de, 1x3 

Sainte Devote, 65—67 
Sl Isidore, 144, 145 
St. Jean, 56, 87 
I« 



St" ... ...„ 

St Martin du ' 



eannet, 95 
Vi 
St. Paul, 96 



ar, 146, 150 



SL Sauveur, 150 
Salisbury, Lord, 69, 99 
Sclos, 155 
Sirocco, 42 



176 



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Smith, Edward, 58 

Smith's Bank, 31, 33, 106, 107 

Souffle* Surprise, 103 

Sud de la France Railway, 93, 

144—150 
Summary of Play, 160, 161 
Swindlers, etc, 165—174 
Systems, 18 

Telegraphic Rates, 176 
Terminus Hotel, Nice, 143 
Ttte de Chien, 56, 58 
Touet de Bcuil, 146, 149, 250 
Tourettes, 04, 95, 113 
Touring Club de France, 27, 
78 



Index 



Train de Luxe, 37, 160 
Trinity Victor, 57, 86, 121 

Ulrich, Mr., 59 

Varnier, Monsieur, 42 
Vence, 95 
•Viatique,' 33 
Villefranche, 69, 72, 87 
Villeneuve-Loubet, 1x4, 140 



Wertheimer, Charles, 
in 

•Zero Fund,' 15, 16 



47. 



177 



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ADDENDA 

ENGLISH DOCTORS AT MONTE CARLO 

Dr. Fagge, Villa dc la Porte Rouge. 
„ FitzGerald, Villa Ciro. 
„ Pryce Mitchell, Villa Henri. 
„ Rolla Rouse, Winter Palace. 
„ Barnard, Villa MaL 

EN6USH DENTIST 

C. Ash, Esq., Villa Paola. 

ENGLISH VICE-CONSUL 

J. W. KEOGH, Esq., Villa Richemont. 

ENGLISH BANK 

Messrs. Smith & Co., Chartered Bankers, 
Galerie Charles III. 

179 * 



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Addenda 



HAILS 

Mails leave Monte Carlo for Paris and London, 
1.40 p.m., 2.55 p.m., 7.45 p.m., and 11.30 p.m. 

Mails leave Monte Carlo for Italy, etc., 6.45 a.m., 
and 9.55 p.m. 

Mails arrive from Paris and London, 9 a.m., and 
4.30 p.m. 

Mails arrive from Italy, etc., 9 a.m., and 4.30 p.m. 

TELEGRAPHIC RATES FROM MONACO 

Centime* 

To France, Corsica, Algiers, Tunis, 

per word 5 

„ Switzerland and Belgium .12.5 

„ Germany 15 

„ British Isles, Austria, Spain, Italy 

and Portugal . . . .20 
„ Gibraltar and Denmark . .24.5 

„ Malta and Russia . . .40 

„ Greece ...... 53.5 

MONACO CAB FARES 

IN THE PRINCIPALITY 
From 7 a.m. till 12.30 p.m. 

Francs 

The course 1.50 

„ hour 3.00 

From 12.30 p.m. till 7 a.m. 

„ course 2.50 

„ hour . . . . 5.00 

1 So 



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Addenda 



SPECIAL FARES 

TO THE ENGLISH CHURCH 

Francs 

By the course 2 

„ „ hour . . . 3 

To Eze station and back with 1 hr. 

wait . . . . . .8 

„ Beaulieu and back with i£ hrs. 

■ wait 13 

„ Villefranche and back with i£ hrs. 

wait . . . . .16 

I „ Nice and back with 3 hrs. wait . 25 . 

/* „ „ going or returning by Cor- 

J niche road . . . .40 

> „ Roquebrune station and back with- 

J. out waiting .... 5 

„ Cap Martin Hotel and back with 

1 £ hrs. wait . . . .10 
„ Mentone and back with ij hrs. 

wait . . . . . , . 14 
„ Mentone vid Cap Martin and back 

with 1 \ hrs. wait . . .14 
„ Roquebrune village and back with 

1 hr. wait 12 

„ La Turbie village and back with 1 \ 

hrs. wait ". 18 

„ Laghet village and back with 3 hrs. 

wait 25 

If kept beyond the times specified, payment to be 
made at the rate of 3 francs per hour. 

N.B. — Cabmen expect ^pourboire in addition to 
the above fares at the rate of about 10 per cent, of 

the fare. 

181 



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Richard Clay & Sons, Limited, 
London & Bungay. 




AMHUCAS MOST 
COMPREHENSIVE COUKTION 

_ ON THE — 

MAGIC ARTS 



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SMITH & CO. 

BANKERS 

Galerie Charles III, MONTE CARLO. 

AGENTS FOR 

The International Sleeping-Car Company 

London, Chatham & Dover Railway Company 

North German Lloyd 

Hamburg American Steam Packet Company, etc. 

TICKETS ISSUED 
STEAMSHIP PASSAGES BOOKED 

SLEEPING BERTHS SECURED 

LONDON AGENTS : Lloyd's Bank, St. James's St 
See p*gt 31. 



iCmMarmrr 



**mu$m 



LA LIQVOR 

GRAND MARNIER 

As supplied to 

H.M. Queen Victoria; H.R.H. the Prince of Wales; 

H.I.M. the Emperor of Austria ; and to the 

Court of Russia. 



3be best, purest and moat Digestive of liqueurs 
Has a moat exquisite orange flavour. 

Set f*g* 133. 



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MONTE CARLO 



Hotel Metropole 

Recently enlarged. Opens end of November. 
Occupies a beautiful position overlooking the sea 
and Public Gardens. It contains every possible 
comfort and luxury. Electric light throughout. 
Restaurant Fran^ais. Cuisine and Wines of the 
highest class. The Me'tropole Orchestra plays 
a selection of choice music during Luncheon and 
Dinner, and in Entrance Hall (4.30 to 5.30), 
throughout the Season. Lifts to all floors. Numer- 
ous Family Apartments with Bath-room, etc. Large 
number of Double and Single Bedrooms, all most 
comfortably furnished. Large Hall and Public 
Rooms. Perfect Sanitation. 



Metropole Villas 

Facing full South, communicate directly with the 
Hotel by covered corridor. All principal apart- 
ments have Private Bath-room, etc., and they there- 
fore offer to Families all the quietude of a Private 
Residence with the convenience of a well-appointed 
Hotel. 



Tariffs in London at the Grand, . Mdtropole, or Vic- 
toria Hotels, and Brighton at the Hdtel Mdtropole. 



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. • CANNES 

THE HOTEL METROPOLE 

OPENS END OF OCTOBER. 

Most beautifully situated in elevated and well-sheltered position, 
facing doe South, twenty-seven acres of Garden and Pine Woods 
belonging to Hotel, including large Lawn Tennis Courts. 

Numerous Family Apartments, with Bath-rooms, etc. Also 
large number of double and single Bedrooms, most comfortably 
furnished, all at very moderate prices. Lifts to all floors. Large 
Hall and Public Rooms. Electric Light everywhere. Perfect 
Sanitation by leading London Engineer. A most comfortable 
Hotel to pass the winter at 

TARIFFS, &*c 9 in London at the GRAND, 
M&TROPOLE, or VICTORIA HOTELS; and 
Brighton, at the M&TROPOLE. 



The Gordon Hotels 



ARE 

GRAND HOTEL .. . 
HOTEL MfiTROPOLE) 

and [ 

WHITEHALL ROOMS J 
H6TEL VICTORIA 
FIRST AVENUE HOTEL 
H6TEL METROPOLE! 

and V 

CLARENCE ROOMS J 
BURLINGTON HOTEL y 
ROYAL PIER HOTEL . 
♦CLIFTONVILLE HOTEL 
LORD WARDEN HOTEL 
HOTEL MtTROPOLE . 
GRAND HOTEL . 



LONDON. 

LONDON. 

LONDON. 
LONDON. 

BRIGHTON. 

EASTBOURNE. 

RYDE, I. ofW. 

MARGATE. 

DOVER. 

FOLKESTONE. 

BROADSTAIRS. 



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THE 

INTERNATIONAL SLEEPING CAR GO. 



Frequent Trains-de-Luxe to and from 
the Riviera. Sleeping Cars attached to 
all Rapide Trains. 

London Office 14 Cockspur Street. 

Paris ... 3 Place de 1' Opera. 

Monte Carlo Gallery of the Grand 

Hotel and SMITH'S 
BANK. 

The . Official Guide and Time- Book of the Company, 
"THE CONTINENTAL TRAVELLER" sent 
post free on application. 

See jag* 37. 

MONTE CARLO 

AND 

TURBIE RAILWAY 



Frequent Trains by this Mountain 
Railway to La Turbie (in 20 minutes), 
from whence a Magnificent View is 
obtained. 

See pages 53, 78, etc. 



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INTERNATIONAL PALACE CO. 

(Cie. Intle. DES GRANDS HOTELS) 



The following is a list of the Company's Hotels — 

The Riviera Palace Monte Carlo 

The Riviera Palace Nice (Cimiez) 

The Qhezireh Palace . Cairo 

Shepheard's Hotel . Cairo 

Elysee Palace Hotel Paris 

The Royal Chateau <T Ardennes Ardennes 

Pavilion de Bellevue Paris (Meudon) 

Hotel Victoria Ismailia 

The Bosphorus Summer Palace Therapia 

The Hdtel de la Plage Ostend 

The Avenida Palace Lisbon 

The Pera Palace Constantinople 

The Grand Hotel International . Brindisi 
Hdtel Stephanie, Casinos and Villas, 

Abazzia (Istria) 

The Hdtel Terminus (St. Jean) Bordeaux 



For Particulars apply to the Company s Offices, 

14, Cockspur Street, LONDON, S.W. 
and 3, Place de POpera, PARIS. 

The Official Guide and Time-Book of the Company, 
"THE CONTINENTAL TRAVELLER? sent 
post free on application. 

Seepage 54. 



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SAVOY HOTEL 

LONDON 

OVERLOOKING RIVER AND EMBANKMENT GARDENS. 

By day the most beautiful garden and river view in Europe. 

By night a fairy scene. 
All charges for Rooms include Baths* Lights and Attendance. 

Suites of rooms, Sitting, Bedroom, private 
Bath-room, etc., from 30/- a day. Single Bed- 
rooms from 7/6. Double from 12/-. Special 
Telephone to Paris. 

Every sitting-room suite has a private Bath-room, 
as have most of the Bedroom suites. Pure Water 
from Artesian Well. Finest and safest Otis 
Elevators. 

General Manager, Mr. H. B. Robarts. Hotel Manager^ 
Mr. K. Sailer. 



SAVOY RESTAURANT 

Of Gastronomic Fame. Dinners a la carte. 
Private Rooms for Parties. 

THE SAVOY DEJEUNER a prix fixe, 5/-, 
served on the Balcony overlooking the Gardens 
and River from 12 till 3. "THE OPERA 
SUPPER" 5/-. 

The Orchestra plays during Dinner and Supper. 

The Restaurant is under the direction of the 
famous Maitre d' Hdtel, "JOSEPH," of the 
Restaurant Marivaux, Paris. Chef, Maitre Thou- 
raud. 

PRIX FIXE DINNER (7/6) is served in the 
new Salle-&-Manger, on the Restaurant floor, at 
Separate Tables, from 6 to 8-30. 
6 



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UNDER THE SAME DIRECTION AS THE SAVOY HOTEL. 

The Grand Hotel, Rome. 

The most beautiful and comfortable Hotel in Italy, 

THE GRAND HOTEL RESTAURANT has been 
enlarged and redecorated for the present season. The 
cuisine equals that of the Savoy Hotel. 

CHARMING 8UITE8 OF ROOMS. 
Manager • • • M*. A. PFYFFER. 
(Proprietor of the Hotel National, Lucerne.) 

ALSO UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE SAVOY HOTEL 

The Restaurant De Marivaux, Paris, 

Known as " JOSEPH'S/' 
VIS-A-VIS THE NEW OPERA COMIQUE 

A PERFECT CUISINE. 

( 

Maestro Boldi plays during Dinner and Supper. 

CLABIDGE'S HOTEL, 

Brook Street, Grosvenor Square, W., 

! IN THE CENTRE OF FASHIONABLE LONDON. 

• THE "LAST WORD" IN MODERN HOTEL LUXURY. 

■' Most beautiful suites of Rooms — all sizes— many of them 

specially suited for families who wish to avoid the trouble of 
a furnished mansion during the London Season. 

! ROYAL SUITE WITH PRIVATE ENTRANCE. 

8lngit and dotubtt B*droom$. . Nearly, one hundrtl Bath-rooms. 

I Manafer - - - M. HENRI MENGE. 

I (Formerly of the Grand Hotel, Monte Carlo, the Hdtel Stahlbad, St. 

Moritx, and Proprietor 01 the Hotel Bellevue, San Remo.) 
Chef de cuisine - - - M. NIONON. 
I (For three years bead chef of Paillard's Restaurant at Paris.) 

• 7 



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THE 

GRAND HOTEL 

LIMITED 

MONTE CARLO. 

H. NOEL and PATTARD, Managing Directors. 

OPEN FROM ist DECEMBER FOR THE SEASON. 

DIRECTORS : 

Hon. A. BOURKE, of White's Club, 
C. RITZ, \ of the Hotel Ritz, Place 

L. ECHENARD, J Venddme, Paris. 



And also the Winter Rig hi at La Turble. 

See pages 127-133. 

CAP MARTIN HOTEL 

THE FASHIONABLE RESORT 



Twenty- five minutes' drive from Monte Carlo 



SPLENDID RESTAURANT 

DEJEUNERS AND DINNERS 
A PRIX FIXE ET A LA CARTE 

See fage 58. 

8 



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CIRO'S BAR 



AND 



HIGH-CLASS RESTAURANT, 

GALERIE CHARLES III, 

MONTE CARLO. 



LUNCHEONS, DINNERS, 
j TEAS, SUPPERS, 

| 'THE VERY BEST.' 

( Sit fag" 43— 49. >k>- 

i — — 

f 

Hotel and Restaurant 
I de Paris, 

MONTE CARLO 



OPEN ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 
The Nearest Hotel to the Casino. 



L. DURETESTE, Mom. FLEURY, 

Proprietor. Manager. 

Set fngts >oi— 104, 163. 

9 



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DAILY $,ty ^xbltXK CimtS DAILY 

EDITOaiAL AND PUBLISHING OFFICES : NICE 



Published Daily during the Riviera Season 

from i st January to 30th April, 

at NICE and the different English Centres 

along the Coast of the Mediterranean, 

from HYERES to SAN REMO; 

and circulating throughout 

Switzerland, Italy, Algiers, Cairo, etc. 



Special Telegraphic and Telephonic Services from 
all the European Centres, supplied by Staff of 
Special Correspondents. 



BE A ULIEU-SUR-MER 



THE 

HOTEL BRISTOL 



This Magnificent Hotel, specially built to 

suit English Requirements, and appointed in 

the most luxurious manner, will OPEN in 
JANUARY 1899. 

HIGH-CLASS RESTAURANT. 
FIVE MILES FROM MONTE CARLO. 

Set }agt 69. - • 



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HOTEL DES ANGLAIS 

MONTE CARLO. 

Entirely re-furnished and newly decorated by 
the new Proprietor. 

PATRONIZED BY THE NOBILITY AND GENTRY. 

Sanitary Arrangements perfect. 

FINEST POSITION IN MONTE CARLO. 

\ RESTAURANT AND TABLE D'HdTE. 

| Xaftie*' Saloon and Smofefti0 'Room. . 

( LIFT. ELECTRIC LIGHT. G. LUDWIG, Proprietor. 

WEINBERG & Co., 

43a, Duke Street, St. James', S.W. 

Maker* of the celebrated 

| "SPECIAL' CIGARETTES 

as supplied to the Royal Family, London Clubs, 
and Regimental Meases. 

PRICES : Large, 85. per 100 ; Small, 75. per 100. 

Special terms for quantities. 

f Guaranteed of the very finest Yenidje and Mahala Tobaccos. 

Particular attention Is called to a new blend, mild and sweet, 
/ . prepared especially for Ladies. 



Plain, Gold, Aluminium, and Cork Tips. 
XI 



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GRAND HOTEL DU PRINCE DE GALLES 

ET 

GRAND HOTEL VICTORIA 

MONTE CARLO 

Specially recommended to Families. 

Situated in the midst of large Garden. Elevated 
and climatic position. Superb view of Sea and Town. 
Apartments furnished with every regard for comfort. 

350 Rooms. Conversation, Reading, Billiard, and 
Bath Rooms. 

Lifts. Electric Light throughout 

Restaurant a la Carte and at Fixed Prices. Famous for 
good Cooking. 

Proprietors, REY FRERES. 

See page 163. 

SAVOY HOTEL 

MONTE CARLO 



Facing the Casino, with View over the Gardens. 

RESTAURANT 

Dejeuners, fcs. 4; Dinners, fcs. 5. 



CHOICE CELLAR. SUPPERS. 

VOIRON, Proprietaire. 



See page 164. 



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GRAND 

Hotel St. James 

MONTE CARLO 

NEW FIRST-CLASS HOTEL, opposite the 
Casino and Public Gardens, offering every modern 
comfort, being the last built. Patronized by the 
nobility. 

LIFT. ELECTRIC LIGHT. 

SCHINDLER & Co., Proprietors. 

Seepage 164. 

HOTEL ROYAL 

MONTE CARLO 

ONE OF THE BEST SITUATIONS 
HIGH AND HEALTHY. 



70 Room* and Saloons, newly fitted up with 
modern convenience and comfort 



FIRST-CLASS FAMILY HOTEL- 
OPEN ALL THE YEAR ROUND 

CRETTAZ BROTHERS, Proprietors. 

I Seefage 164. 

) '3 



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MONTE CARLO 



Hotel and Restaurant 
" PRINCESS " 

Full South, overlooking Casino Gardens and Sea. 



HIGH-CLASS RESTAURANT. 

Dinners, and Suppers, Grill 
American Drinks. 

LOUIS AUBANEL, Proprietor. 



Luncheons, Dinners, and Suppers, Grill Room, 
American Drinks. 



See page 164. 



MON TE CA RLO 
HOTEL WINDSOR 

AND 

HOTEL DE ROME 

(ANNEXE). 

Situated in the most charming and healthy part of 
Monte Carlo. Sanitary arrangements and Bath Rooms, 
executed by George Jennings, London. Arrangements 
may be made for a protracted stay. 

LAWN TENNIS. LIFT. 
ELECTRIC LIGHT IN EVERY ROOM. 



A. QAILLARD and FAU, Proprietors. 

Seepage 163. 

14 



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HOTEL H ELDER 

MONTE CARLO 



NEWLY BUILT. 

FINELY SITUATED. 

RENOWNED FOB GOOD COOKING. 

See fage 164. 



Hotel and Restaurant de TEurope 

MONTE CARLO 



Magnificent Terrace with view over the Sea. 

ELECTRIC LIGHT. 

Dejeuners lc». 3; Dinner* Ice. 4; inclndin* Red or White Wine 

Special Terms for Ionic Stay 



FRANCOIS RINJOUX, Prop. 

Ex-Maltre a'H6tel of the 

H6TEL DE PARIS AND SAVOY HOTEL, LONDON. 

Set fog* 164. 

15 



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Riviera Land Company, 



LIMITED. 



EZE-SUR-MER. 

Situated on the high-road between Beaulieu and Monte Carlo. 



A large Property has recently been acquired by 
an English Syndicate, who propose erecting an 
Hotel and Villas, and, generally, to develop the 
same on the most modern principles. 

Eze-sur-Mer is most admirably situated at an 
easy distance from Beaulieu (2 miles) and Monte 
Carlo (5 miles), with both of which it is connected 
by an excellent carriage road and the railway, 
having a Station adjoining the property, through 
which more than eighty trains pass daily in the 
winter season. 

Building Lots are now offered for sale on 
exceptionally advantageous terms. 

It is proposed shortly to instal Gas and Electric 
works, together with a completed system of 
drainage. In a word, to transform this favoured 
spot into a Model Health Resort, replete with all 
modern requirements. 

For full particulars, plans, etc., apply to 

Messrs. SMITH & Co., 

' Bankers and Estate Agents, 

Galerie Charles III, 

Monte Carlo. 

16 



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NICE 

First-Glass Restaurant 
THE LONDON HOUSE 

Seepage^.. 

NICE 

Grand Hotel Terminus. 

Opposite the Railway Station. Open all the year 
round. Latest Improvements* and Sanitary . 
Arrangements perfect. Electric Light. 

N.B. — Luggage is conveyed to and from the Hotel with- 
out any cost. Clerk to the Hotel takes Tickets and registers 
Travellers 1 Luggage. It is sufficient to leave the Hotel five 
minutes before the departure of the Train. Advantageous 
arrangements for protracted stay. 

SPEOIAL STORAGE FOR BICYCLES. 

Sttpag€ 143- 

17 b 



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MISS 5. E. BROWN, 

COURT DRESSMAKER, 

CHATHAM HOUSE, 

13*. High Road, Knightsbridge, 
LONDON. 



Patronized by the Royal Family. 



PATTERNS AND ESTIMATES SENT 
TO ALL PARTS OF THE GLOBE. 

18 



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BAGGAGE 

TO AND FROM ENGLAND 

PITT & SCOTTS, 

> THE BEST AND SAFEST MEDIUM. 

10*2)0*. 

25, Cannon St., E.C. ; 69, Shaftesbury Avenue ; and Northumberland 
Avenue (adjoining Avenue Theatre). 

mrapooi. pabis. vzw toml 

4. Red Cross St. 7, Rue Scribe and 4, Rue Cambon. 39, Broadway. 

CORRESPONDENTS 
OA*WBS.—J. Valat, 9, Rue St. Nicholas. 
WIOl.— Scott & Co., 2, Place St. Etienne. 
XE*TO*X.~Gustave Cochet, x, Rue St. Michel. 
KOHTE GABIO.-V. F. Cursi, Ave de la Gare. 

Hotel and Restaurant Dieudonne. 

RYDER ST., ST. JAMES'S S.W. 
Handsomely decorated In Louis XV. style. 



Luncheon 3s. 6d. ; Theatre Dinner 6s. ; Special 
Dinner 8s.; Theatre Supper 4s. 6d. Service 
Special a la carte. 



Manager, MR. AUGUSTS GIOVANNINI 

{From Grand Hotel Royal, Dieppe). 

Proprietor, C. Guffanti. 

Telegraphic Address, Guffanti, London. 

Telephone No. 5265, Gerrard. 

19 



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PAQUIN 

LONDON AND PARIS 



Dresses 



Mantles and Jackets 
Tailor-made Garments 

Rich Furs 

Teagowns and Lingerie 

Trousseaux 



Each Design is Original, and produced 
simultaneously with its appearance in the 
Paris House. 



PAQUIN Ltd. 

39 DOVER STREET, MAYFAIR, LONDON 



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ST. MARCEAUX 

CHAMPAGNE 

(REIMS) 

To be obtained at all the best Hotels and 
Restaurants throughout the World. 

AGENTS: . 
PARIS, 18, Boulevard des Capacities. 
LONDON, S, Mark Lane, E.C. 
NEW YORK, 21, South William Street. 



Seepage 13a. 



A BOON TO TRAVELLERS 

To and from the Riviera. 

HENRY JOHNSON & SONS 

LOHIX).?, 89, Gt Tower St, B.C., tad PtooaflUy Circiu. 
PAKIS, 67, Bub d'HaaUrffle, aad ft, Eae Scribe. 

COSMOPOLITAN BAOOAOE EXPRESS 

BETWEEN ALL PART8. 
FIXED INCLUSIVE RATES HOUSE TO HOUSE. 
Insurance against Loss or Robbery in Transit. 
Dry 8torage at all depots 3d. per package per week. 
BRANCHES- 
NICE :-.-.. . . »» Rub Grimaldi. • 
CANNES: . 3, Square Mhrimee. 

MENTON : Rw Partouneaux. 

MARSEILLES : . . 4«t Ru* Mont Grand. 
List of Agencies, Rates, and fullest Information on Application. 
21 



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HOTEL RITZ 

RESTAURANT 

PLACE VEND6ME 

PARIS 

OPEN SINGE THE 1st JUNE, 1898. 

The appointments of this Hotel 
are unique in Europe. Every 
Room is fitted with a Private 
Bath Room, etc. Stylish Suites 
of Apartments. 

The Restaurant with its exten- 
sive Terraces, lovely Gardens, and 
Fountains, is the smartest Rendez- 
vous in Paris. 

The Apartments overlook either 
the Place Venddme or fine Private 
Gardens, and are exposed full 
South. 



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%\t gtenion aito gjonte Carb $efos 

Should be read by every one 

Contains the latest Society News 
Lists of Arrivals 

Programmes of all the coming F6tes 
Railway Time Table 

Church Services, Cab Fares, etc. 
Full reports of F&es, Parties 
EVERY SATURDAY 
Price, 20 centimes. Season Subscription, j francs. 

Subscriptions and Advertisements received at— 

The OFFICES OF THE PAPER. 

SMITH'S BANK Monte Carlo. 

THE ENGLISH VICE-CONSULATE Menton. 

1 All Communications to be addressed to the Editor— 

Rue Prmto, MBNTON. 

Crutrl gressmahcr antr glillmer 

i • 

1 // and 12, Dover Street, Piccadilly, 

LONDON, w. 



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Sud de la France Railway Lines 

i. Meyrargues to Nice (211 kilomfetres) vid 
Draguignan, Grasse and Colomars. 

2. Nice to Puget-Th6iiers (59 km.) vid Colomars. 

3. Digne to St. Andr£ (44 km.). 

4. Hyferes to St. Raphael (83 km.). 

5. Cogolin to St Tropez (10 km.). 

$9* The trains on the Sud de la France Line are in 
correspondence with those of the P. L. M. Co. at the 
stations of Meyrargues, Draguignan, Digne, St. Raphael 
and Lfyires. 

Tickets of the following kinds are issued : 

1. At the principal stations of the line direct 

tickets (single or return) to the P. L. M: 
stations of Marseilles, Aix, Toulon, Nice, 
Cannes, etc. (and vice versd). 

2. Return tickets at reduced fares between all the 

stations and haltes of each line. 

3. Excursion tickets at greatly reduced rates. 

4. Circular tickets in connection with the P. L. M. 

railway for the following routes : 

I. — Nice, Antibes, Cannes, Grasse, Le Loup, Colomars 
and Nice. 

II. — Nice, Antibes, Cannes, St. Raphael, Frejus, Dra- 
guignan, Grasse, Le Loup, Colomars and Nice. 

III.— Nice, St. Raphael, Ste. Maxime, Hyeres, Toulon, 
Carnoules, St: Raphael and Nice. 



Buffets at the following stations — Meyrargues, Draguignan, 
Grasse, Colomars, La Tinie, Puget-Thiniers and St. Andre's. 



24 



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Sud de la France Railway Lines 

[continued]. 

For more Retailed information apply to— 

(a) The central administration at Paris — 66, Rue de la 
Chaussle d'Antin. 

(6) The chef de Pexploitation at Nice (Gare du Sud). 

(c) The Inspector of the Exploitation of the Littoral line at 
St. Raphael (Var).- 



Aak for Special Illustrated Guides to the 
Sud de la Trance Bailway. 



Principal points of interest to the Tourist— 

i. Between Nice and Grasse— Colomars (Manda 
Bridge across the Var), St. Jeannet, Vence, Tour- 
rettes, the Gorges of the Loup (well worth a visit) 
and Grasse. Duration of railway between Nice 
and Grasse about 2 h. 20 m. Magnificent views all 
( the way. 

• 2. Between Nice and Puget-Theniers — Beyond 

Colomars, La Rdquettesur-Var, Levens, Gillette 
^ (lovely excursions) ; further on, Gorges of La 

( Mescla and of Cians (very striking) ; the valley of 

; the V^subie ; the village of Touet-de-Beuil (one of 

\ the quaintest to be met with, and a convenient 

\ starting-point for several excursions into the moun- 

tains); Puget-Theniers, and beyond that Entrevaux. 
(Time from Nice to Puget-Theniers about 3 hours.) 

: 3. Between St Raphael and Hyeres (coast line) 

[ — St. Raphael and its environs, Valescure, Frejus 

f (with its amphitheatre), Ste. Maxime (a little port 

I and centre for beautiful excursions), St^Tropez. 



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NORTH GERMAN LLOYD, 

OWNING THE LARGEST FLEET OF MODERN STEAMSHIPS. 



BBGULAB KAIL AND EXPRESS SERVICES 

REACHING ALL POINTS OF THE GLOBE. 



Bremen — Southampton— Cherbourg — New York. 

Genoa — Naples — Gibraltar — New York. 

Bremen — Galveston. 

Bremen — Antwerp — Southampton — Genoa. 

Genoa — Naples — Port Said. 

India — China — Japan. 

Java — New Guinea. 

Genoa — Naples — Australia. 

Bremen and Antwerp to South American Ports. 



Among its largest and swiftest steamships are— 

Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse, Kaiser Friedrich, 
Kaiserin Maria Teresia, Kaiser Wilhelm II, 
Koenig Albert, Prinz Heinrich, Print Regent 
Luitpold, Barbarossa, Friedrich der Grosse, Bremen, 
Koenipn Luise, Lahn, Alter, etc. etc. 

FOR PARTICULARS APPLY TO— 

SMITH'S BANK, NORTH GERMAN LLOYD, 

Galerie Charles ///, 2bis Rue Scribe, 

MONTE CARLO. PARIS. 



\ 

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